Barbara Kingsolver's "Animal Dreams": Alice

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Barbara Kingsolver's "Animal Dreams": Alice

She is dead. She does not appear physically but haunts mentally. She is
Codi and Hallie's mother Alice, the late wife of Homero Noline. Throughout the novel Animal Dreams by Barbara Kingsolver, Alice impacted the characters, action, and theme(s). When Alice passed away she took part of Homer with her. What she left was a misfit of time and circumstance; an emotionally distraught and distant man who attempted to resemble a father but veered more towards the tin man. Homero existed beyond his wife as only a page out of an instruction manual, the one with the caution statement. Homero's delicate heart decided that the only way to endure Alice's death was to flush any remembrance or resemblance of her out of his fortified technical realm which throughout the novel becomes increasingly skewed. Kingsolver pushes home this idea by omitting Alice from any of Homer's frequent flashbacks which are usually mishaps from the past involving his daughters. These incidents are his only recollection of his daughters' estranged childhood in which he strained to create slippery and unmothered women. Homer's fear of becoming attached to anything which reminded him of
Alice resulted in an unorthodox childhood for Hallie and Codi. Homero was more of a child mechanic than a father. Retaining only his technical aptitude after
Alice died all he could do was provide his kids with orthopedic shoes and the correct medicine. When not fixing Codi or Hallie's present or future ailments
Homero took photographs of natural objects and slyly transformed them into man- made devices by doing what he seemed to be best at, distorting images. Codi, similar to her father mentally blocked out her past. Her childhood remained within her as only a series of stained and misplaced memories. Codi attempted to follow in her father's emulsion lined footprints, fixing every one of life's problems with an internal wrench. By approaching life
from

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