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BA NIKONGO THE CARIBBEAN FROM EMANCIP

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BA NIKONGO THE CARIBBEAN FROM EMANCIP
Daiana Almanzar 10/9/14 Ba'Nikongo: The Caribbean: From Emancipation to Independence

The abolition of slavery was a moderate, continuous and uneven process all through the Caribbean. After more than three centuries under an uncaring work framework in which a large number of Africans from numerous spots kicked the bucket in the fields and urban areas of the Caribbean, the procedure of abolition was the subject of genuine and profound thought for the segments fixing to the estate economy, the administration and, most importantly, for the slaves themselves. Britain headed the abolitionist transform that alternate forces would take after, whether through weight from the monetary and political winds of the period or through the powers practiced by the Caribbean states. Whatever the circumstances, the nineteenth century Caribbean continuously saw the vanishing of a financial and social framework that decided the structure of the provinces. Various monetary, political, social and social components joined in the Caribbean and prompted the end of this unpleasant social structure. This exposition analyzes all the more nearly the methodology of abolition in the British settlements, due to their significance and repercussions for whatever is left of the Caribbean. It additionally considers the instance of Cuba and Puerto Rico, the last two bastions of the Spanish realm in the Americas.

1. Why did African labor emerge as the labor of choice in the colonies? What was the nature of plantation life in the Caribbean colonies? The European winners initially subjugated the locals of the America's (North, Central and South) to till the ground, work in the mines, and so on. On the other hand, the "Indians" ended up being feeble. They had almost no safety against the European expires (smallpox, the sickness). With the "rottenness" the Europeans have wiped out whole countries. The Africans, were far stronger than the Indians. That is the reason the Europeans

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