Autonomic Nervous System and Obj

Satisfactory Essays
Chapter 9
Motivation and Emotion

MULTIPLE CHOICE

1. Motives activate behavior and propel the organism
a.|to flee.|c.|toward goals.|
b.|to respond.|d.|to drives.|

ANS: C DIF: 2 REF: 9-188 OBJ: 1
MSC: TYPE: Factual

2. The study of motivation is an attempt to understand __________ a behavior occurs.
a.|why|c.|when|
b.|how|d.|all of these|

ANS: A DIF: 1 REF: 9-188 OBJ: 1
MSC: TYPE: Factual NOT: BTC

3. Psychologists define hypothetical states that activate behavior and propel one towards goals as
a.|needs.|c.|drives.|
b.|motives.|d.|incentives.|

ANS: B DIF: 1 REF: 9-188 OBJ: 1
MSC: TYPE: Factual

4. Motives are described as hypothetical states because
a.|they cannot be seen or measured directly.|
b.|they cannot be measured.|
c.|there is no theory of motivation.|
d.|they are questionable.|

ANS: A DIF: 1 REF: 9-188 OBJ: 1
MSC: TYPE: Conceptual

5. The study of motivation is complex because it cannot be directly observed, only
a.|inferred from behavior.|c.|assumed to exist.|
b.|compared with other behavioral forces.|d.|subjectively viewed.|

ANS: A DIF: 1 REF: 9-188 OBJ: 1
MSC: TYPE: Conceptual

6. Motives can take the form of
a.|needs, drives, and incentives.|c.|stimuli, events, and actions.|
b.|requirements, desires, and impulses.|d.|both a and b|

ANS: A DIF: 2 REF: 9-188 OBJ: 1
MSC: TYPE: Factual

7. Examples of physiological needs are
a.|oxygen, food, water and proper temperature.|
b.|love, esteem and finances.|
c.|waste elimination.|
d.|both a and c|

ANS: D DIF: 1 REF: 9-188 OBJ: 1
MSC: TYPE: Conceptual

8. Motives are believed to give rise to
a.|incentives.|c.|behavior.|
b.|drives.|d.|needs.|

ANS: C DIF: 3 REF: 9-188 OBJ: 1
KEY: WWW MSC: TYPE: Factual

9. Needs can be described as
a.|physiological and psychological.|c.|psychological and spiritual.|
b.|physiological and biological.|d.|permanent states.|

ANS: A DIF: 1 REF: 9-188 OBJ: 1
MSC: TYPE: Factual

10. Physiological needs must be met
a.|by caretakers.|c.|in order to be

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