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Autistic Children Research Paper

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Autistic Children Research Paper
Belief : Autistic children are extremely aggressive toward children and adults.
Motive: It is important to take this into account when normal school wants to take in children with some type of autistic problem. They can be aggressive toward the teachers and the rest of the students There can be in some type of danger if this type of children assaults another child.

Title Basal and Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Stimulated Plasma Cortisol Levels Among Egyptian Autistic Children: Relation to Disease Severity

Author Rasha T Hamza
Publisher Italian Journal of Pediatrics 2010, 36:71 Published: 30 October 2010
Abstract
Autism is a disorder of early childhood characterized by social impairment, communication abnormalities and stereotyped behaviors. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis deserves special attention, since it is the basis for emotions and social interactions that are affected in autism. To assess
…show more content…
Children who received a diagnosis of autism (n 40) or AS (n19) on a diagnostic interview when they were 4 to 6 years of age were administered a battery of cognitive and behavioral measures. Families were contacted roughly 6 years later (at mean age of 12 years) and assessed for evidence of psychiatric problems including mood and anxiety disorders. Compared with a sample of 1751 community children, AS and autistic children demonstrated a greater rate of anxiety and depression problems. These problems had a significant impact on their overall adaptation. There were, however, no differences in the number of anxiety and mood problems between the AS and autistic children within this high-functioning cohort. The number of psychiatric

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