Autism and the Feminist Epistemology

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Topics: Family, Marriage, Husband
There is no doubt that once the word autism enters a couple's life, life changes. We look back upon the pregnancy and how we awaited the birth of this child with great anticipation and how we only hoped for a "healthy child."

After a couple of years, it is discovered that this wish was not granted and autism has now entered the picture. The marriage is still there, the child is still there but now autism is there as well, almost as another person in the family unit. What is the effect on marriage once a disability in a child has entered the equation?

Unfortunately it becomes, instead of something that can bind a couple together, a factor that causes stress. Extreme stress and often the marriage is a victim of that stress and fails. But why? Is it necessary to choose between our marriage and our child with autism? Or are we missing something in this daily struggle against this disability that has kidnapped our child.

Once upon a time, a couple met, fell in love, married and that was supposed to be the end of the story. Actually that is when the story really began. After the "I do", the challenges began and no one can tell what the future may hold. In the case of people reading this article, autism is what happened. And it became in many cases a real "monkey wrench" in the machinery of the marriage.

As time progresses and the parents adjust to the fact that their child is afflicted with this disability, there is usually a time of working together to conquer this disability. Looking for answers, the best treatments, the best therapies; during that time teamwork between husband and wife is usually strong.

Then real life sets in and things begin to change. Autism then becomes the newest member of the family. It is something that both adults realize isn't going away. It becomes a day-to-day routine, becoming often times more difficult as the child gets older. Your student has plagiarized this paper. It becomes a trial that brings stresses never before

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