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Topics: Psychometrics, General intelligence factor, Educational psychology Pages: 11 (1043 words) Published: January 30, 2014
Abstract Reasoning—Practice Test 1

Psychometric Success

Abstract
Reasoning
Practice Test 1

Authors:

Paul Newton
Helen Bristoll
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Abstract Reasoning—Practice Test 1

T

he aptitudes and abilities measured by verbal and numeric reasoning tests can easily be related to real world tasks and jobs, as many jobs require some degree

of skill with words and numbers. Abstract reasoning tests on the other hand, seem to consist of questions which have little or no application in the real world. Yet these types of question appear in most graduate and management aptitude tests. Why is this?

Abstract reasoning tests date back to the research done by the psychologist Charles Spearman in the 1920’s. Spearman used a statistical technique called factor analysis to examine relationships between people’s scores on different types of intelligence tests.

He concluded that people who do well on some intelligence tests also do well on others (e.g. vocabulary, mathematics, spatial abilities). Conversely, if people do poorly on an intelligence test, they also tended to do poorly on other intellectual tests. This led him to believe that there are one or more factors that are common to all intellectual tasks.

As a result of this research Spearman developed a two-factor theory of intelligence.

s
Mechanical

s
Verbal

g

Numerical
s

s
Spatial

g - General Ability
s - Specific Abilities

As the diagram shows, Spearman said that intelligence is mainly made up of ‘g’, with bright people having a lot, and dull people having less. Spearman defined ‘g’ as: “the innate ability to perceive relationships and educe co-relationships”

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Abstract Reasoning—Practice Test 1

If we replace the word ‘educe’ with ‘work out’ then you can see why abstract reasoning questions are seen to be a good measure of general intelligence, as they test your ability to perceive relationships and then to work out any co-relationships without you requiring any knowledge of language or mathematics.

Abstract reasoning tests use diagrams, symbols or shapes instead of words or numbers. They involve identifying the underlying logic of a pattern and then determining the solution. Because they are visual questions and are independent of language and mathematical ability, they are considered to be an accurate indicator of your general intellectual ability as well as being ‘culturally fair’.

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Abstract Reasoning—Practice Test 1

Test 1—25 Questions
Answer as many questions as you can in 20 minutes. Circle the letter on the right which corresponds to the correct answer.
1) Which figure completes the series?

A B C D
2) Which figure completes the series?

A B C D
3) Which figure completes the series?

A B C D
4) Which figure completes the series?

A B C D

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Abstract Reasoning—Practice Test 1

5) Which figure completes the series?

A B C D
6) Which figure completes the statement?

A B C D
7) Which figure completes the statement?

A B C D
8) Which figure completes the statement?

A B C D

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Abstract Reasoning—Practice Test 1

9) Which figure completes the statement?

A B C D
10) Which figure completes the statement?

A B C D
11) Which figure is the odd one out?

A B C D E
12) Which figure is the odd one out?

A B C D E
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Abstract Reasoning—Practice Test 1

13) Which figure is the odd one out?

A B C D E
14) Which figure is the odd one out?

A B C D E
15) Which figure is the odd one out?

A B C D E
16) Which figure completes the series?

A B C D

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Abstract Reasoning—Practice Test 1

17) Which...
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