Preview

Augustinian Strengths and Weaknesses

Satisfactory Essays
Open Document
Open Document
274 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
Augustinian Strengths and Weaknesses
Augustine
|Strengths |Weaknesses |
|Brian Davies supports the claim that evil is a deprivation and not a substance. If it is not a substance|It is logically incorrect to claim that a perfect world could ever go wrong according to Schleiermacher. |
|then God could not have created it and cannot be held responsible for it. |Even is evil is a deprivation it is a very real feature of the world and cannot have created itself from |
|Evil as the result of free-will and not divine will can be supported. Freedom necessarily entails the |nothing. Either the world was not a perfect creation or God enabled it to go wrong. |
|potential for evil. We have to have a real choice. |Augustine claims that we have free-will, but in a world without knowledge of good or evil it is not |
|Plantinga argues that humans who had been designed to always choose good would not have been free. |possible to have free-will (note that Adam and Eve freely chose to eat of the tree of knowledge of good |
|Augustine accounts for both types of evil. We also need natural evil for genuine freedom. |and evil). |
|Evil is justified by free-will – that is to say that it is worth it. |If we chose to disobey God we must have had knowledge of evil which can only have come from God. |
|Augustine’s theory complies with scripture. |Augustine’s seminally present argument is scientifically inaccurate. |
|

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Powerful Essays

    Augustine viewed human nature in only one way: good and evil. Augustine lived in an era when the pillar of strength and stability, the Roman Empire, was being shattered, and his own life, too was filled with turmoil and loss. To believe in God, he had to find an answer to why, if God is all-powerful and purely good, he still allowed suffering to exist. Augustine believed that evil existed because all men on earth was granted, at birth, the power of free will. He states that God enables humans to freely choose their actions and deeds, and through our own action and choices evil is established. Even natural evils, such as disease, are indirectly related to…

    • 2815 Words
    • 12 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Theology 202 Essay 1

    • 505 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The question of evil is a common hot button topic among atheists and non-Christians who attempt to disprove Christianity. They argue that an omnipotent and omniscient God cannot exist in a world with so much evil. The argument is used by them to try to prove that Christianity is “internally self-contradictory and thereby to be rejected.” Many claim that a benevolent and caring God would certainly not create evil or allow it to flourish in the world that He created. So, the problem of evil is how to explain that there can be a perfect, all-powerful, and all-loving God that exists in a world with so much moral and natural evil.…

    • 505 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    From human nature, there can be either a good or evil will. Human nature comes with the gift of free will, which allows us humans to express our own personal, independent choices based on our own rational thoughts. With the ability to orient our lives in any direction that we choose to, those with both good will and evil will exist. One cannot have both a good and evil will; those with an evil will are actively trying to disharmonize the world, while the good willed keep everything in harmony.…

    • 648 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    t Augustine 354-430 CE, developed a theodicy in order to tackle the ‘Problem of Evil’, the seeming contradiction between God being omnipotent, omnibenevolent and there still being evil in the world. As a Christian, he believed that God had made everything that exists, and that at the moment of creation, everything was perfect, because ‘God saw all that he had made, and it was very good’ Genesis 1: 31. He therefore concluded that ‘evil is not a substance’; it is merely ‘Privatio Boni’ or privation of good, because he thought that ‘things which are liable to corruption are good’, otherwise they cannot be corrupted.…

    • 585 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    in which there is evil, can logically explain the existence of evil in the world.…

    • 2109 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    St Augustine described evil as the ‘privati boni’ (the absence of the good) and Iago…

    • 739 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    A Philosophical theodicy demonstrates that God, being omnipotent, omniscient and omnibenevolent, has good reasons for occasionally allowing the continued existence of evil and suffering. It also demonstrates that the existence of evil and suffering provides greater benefits than the benefits of removing evil . St Augustine, 354 – 430 AD, based his arguments on the Bible; especially the accounts of the Creation and the Fall in Genesis. His influential theodicy rests upon two major assumptions; evil did not come from God, since God’s creation was faultless and perfect. Also that evil, having come from elsewhere, God is justified in allowing it to stay.…

    • 1230 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The explanation for why someone or something is evil can not be easily defined, as the answer may vary based on a person’s psychological thought process or intellectual reasoning. The justification of this paper is to discuss Peter Van Inwagen and his philosophical response to the argument from evil, as well as his free will defense theory for the answer to this complication. I will carefully evaluate the two standard objections to his solution and offer my personal opinion of rather or not he offers a successful resolution for this universal problem.…

    • 321 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Here John Wick confronts the classic Christian teaching rejection of evil by introducing Augustine’s theory. Augustine holds the conviction that the universe is inherently good, but if so, where does evil originate? In Augustine’s theory, he suggests that every matter that God creates is in some form of good, however God did not place disorder or distortion of good in the universe. This is what he means that “evil represents the going wrong of something which in itself is good”: while matter is born good, the perception of good varies resulting the outcome of perceived evil. In a social situation, what I perceive as good, others may perceive as off. Every matter is good, until I distort the value of…

    • 121 Words
    • 1 Page
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Augustine carries on and states that evil comes from free will beings who turned their back on God, which means that God granted us free will due to omnibenevolence and therefore he gave beings to make their own choices meaning that we are entitled to choose between right and wrong. Augustine considers the idea that Jesus was sent to redeem us from our sins, providing us a second chance as well as an opportunity to change ourselves and become one with God. Augustine’s…

    • 998 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Why Does God Allow Evil?

    • 1771 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Many people dispute the true intentions of God, himself, since the beginning of mankind. Opposing and concurring arguments can be just as primitive. Regardless of personal perspective on any indefinite theory, it is undeniable that the controversy between good and evil will inevitably exist. Two dominant philosophers discussed in “The Problem of Evil” are Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz and David Hume. Both of these authors discuss interesting motives from both sides of the issue: why and why not God should allow evil.…

    • 1771 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    Believer or non-believer, we all appear to suffer from the problem of evil. Perhaps in the highly economically and technologically developed countries we live in now we are faced, on a day to day basis, with far less evil, than those 90 years ago on their way to fight in WW1. But there is always a presence of evil. Although it may not be first degree, we see it in the news on a daily basis. Natural, Moral and Metaphysical evil will affect all of us in our lifetime, whether it be a natural disaster, violence or are eventual death, these three different types of evils will be discussed in further detail later in the essay. The problem of evil only seems to affect…

    • 2433 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    Our world is filled with corruption; this proves that there is no God if he cannot help us by preventing evil. The argument of evil basically states that God and evil cannot coincide. There are two types of evil; moral, which is carried out by humans through immoral actions that cause pain and suffering such as murder, rape and so forth. Natural evil is the second type which occurs through inevitable phenomenon’s such as natural disasters; hurricanes, tsunamis and diseases are a few (Sober, 120).…

    • 790 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Free Will Defense

    • 1213 Words
    • 5 Pages

    One of the most persistent challenges to God’s existence is also the root of one of the most asked, but least answerable, questions that we, as human beings, ponder—why is there evil? This dilemma of why the world is filled with evil, anything bad ranging from bullying to natural disasters, has motivated atheists, those who reject God and His existence, to bring forward an argument called “The Problem of Evil”. Due to much debate on the topic, theists, those who believe in God, have tried to resolve the problem of evil by presenting multiple theodicies—attempts to justify or defend God in the face of evil. In this paper, I will present counterarguments to two popular theodicies, the “Free Will Defense” and the “Soul-Making”, in an effort to…

    • 1213 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Philosophy 8

    • 485 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Chapter III focuses on the problem of evil. The table of contents shows it contains discussions on God and evil, evil with regard to varieties of atheism, and free will with evil. The titles and descriptions of this chapter show how it relates to things this class has already discussed; God’s goodness with respect to evil, and free will. These topics are therefore a continuation of that which we have already learned and are familiar with.…

    • 485 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays