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Attachment Theory Essay

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Attachment Theory Essay
The phenomena of children closer to their babysitters or day-carers than their parents are getting common nowadays. This is because mothers are as busy as a bee in pursuing luxury live thus leaving their children to babysitters or day-carers. Separation from mothers will truly affect infants’ and toddlers’ emotional and social development. “Attachment theory is the bond and relationship between one people and another. It usually refers to long term relationship like parents and children.” (Mcleod, S, 2009). Basically, Attachment has four stages, pre-attachment stage (from birth to three months), indiscriminate attachment (from around six weeks of age to seven months), discriminate attachment (seven to eleven months of age) and multiple attachment (after approximately nine months of age). (Study.com, 2015). “Secure attachment is marked by distress when separated from adult caregivers and are joyful when the …show more content…
This is because babysitters and day-cares who are able to satisfy the need of infants or toddles allow them to develop sense of security. So, infants and toddlers think that babysitters and day-carers are more dependable than their parents, which create a secure base for them to explore the world with confidence. (IRISS, 2015). “Attachment theory emphasises the importance of positive attachment experiences for children during the early years and beyond. Recent research shows that early childhood attachment experiences will impact someone’s psychological as well as physiological development. Children who have experienced secure attachments are more likely to develop positive social relationships as they grow to become adults, and to cope well with life challenges.” (History and Theoretical Underpinnings of SCARF, n.d.). They tend to be more able to stand on their own feet, experience less depression and have successful social

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