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Assistive Technology in Education – the Invisible Clock

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Assistive Technology in Education – the Invisible Clock
Assistive Technology in Education – The Invisible Clock

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder or ADHD is one of the most common neurobehavioral disorders of childhood. Children diagnosed with ADHD may have trouble paying attention, controlling impulsive behaviors, or be overly active. Some symptoms of ADHD are daydreaming, easily distracted, act and speak without thinking, forgetting things, interrupt others, and constantly in motion. The cause of ADHD is not yet known and this is a disorder that is not easily treated. Children with ADHD are usually treated with a combination of medication and behavior therapy. Though these methods have proven effective this disorder often persists through childhood and into adulthood. One technology that is proving helpful to children with ADHD is the Invisible Clock. The Invisible Clock is a personal timer that has multiple alarms and custom settings. This technology has many uses but using it as a memory aid helps children with ADHD in the classroom. The Invisible Clock works as an automatic reminder system, which helps children master their time and be more focused. The custom timer feature can be set to vibrate every 15 minutes, which helps a child with ADHD keep track of how much time is passing. The Invisible Clock is also used for kids who need extra help remembering certain things such as paying attention in class. The vibrate function is great for alerting the student wearing the device and not disrupting the entire class when the device vibrates. This is one topic that hits home for me because I have ADHD. I wish this had been available to me when I was going through school because I was easily distracted and once off topic it was extremely hard for me to focus again. I think that this assistive device is great because it is really simple and if used correctly it will condition the student to have longer attention spans. One downside to the Invisible Clock is the price, which is about forty dollars. I am sure there are other alternatives with the same concept out there. I think that the Invisible clock is an effect assistive device for students with ADHD because it takes the pressure of keeping a student on task off of the teacher.

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