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art apprecition
ART Appretiation
10/15/11
Art Essay

This report is on my visit to the Getty Villa. In this report I will go over some of the architectural styling’s of the Getty Villa. Which were inspired by the Villa dei Papiri. The Villa dei Papiri was destroyed by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 A.D. As well as some design elements and details.
Entering the villa the first room I walk into is the atrium. The atrium is the main public room in a Roman house. In the middle of the atrium is an impluvium, which is like a small pool. And it has an open ceiling above it so it can catch rain water. This room leads me out to the Inner Peristyle. Rows of columns surround this beautiful garden. The columns are modeled after those in the House of the Colored Capitals in Pompeii. In the corners are marble fountains that are re-creations from the Villa dei Papri. And a narrow pool is in the center and is lined with replicas of bronze statues that resemble women that would have once been found at the Villa dei Papiri. As I walk around the colonnade I notice the coffered ceiling. This ceiling imitates stone ceilings found on the Street of the Tombs in Pompeii. The colonnades floor is paved with terrazzo.
The next area I enter is the Triclinium which is the main dining room and where guests were entertained. The gorgeous floor is inlaid stone and imitates the one found in the House of Deer in Herculaneum. The ceiling is arched with recessed panels. And illustrated with illusionist scenes with elements inspired by the House of the Fruit Orchard in Pompeii. The walls have Corinthian pilasters that are modeled from the House of Relief of Telephus in Herculaneum. This room leads me out to the Outer Peristyle. This was used to grow plants and fruit trees for the kitchen as well as provide a cool place to sit during the summer months and to bring light and air to the interior of the house.
The walls that surround the colonnade are painted with a motif of

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