Argument Essay 1010

Topics: Genetic engineering, Genetically modified organism, Genetically modified food Pages: 2 (526 words) Published: December 7, 2012
GM Foods, are they our future?
Since the end of the ice age around 11,000 years ago, the climate had been changing and gave the annual plants advantage to grow from seeds and tubers with built in energy reserves to following generation of plants. Mankind took advantage of this by harvesting and storing food supplies. This fact help humanity to preserve and as we settled down we developed agriculture, domesticating the firs plants and animals; this early farmers observed the way things grew and reproduced. Then, they started choosing the biggest and healthiest plants seeds to grow the next generation, this is selecting breeding, and these were the first genetic engineers.

Bibliography
CHEFSREF. OUR FUTURE OF GENETICALLY ENGINEERED FOOD. 09 February 2012. 22 July 2012 <http://chefsref.hubpages.com/hub/OUR-FUTURE-OF-GENETICALLY-ENGINEERED-FOOD>. He grew up in the White Mountains of N.H. Local inns and chefs inspired me to pursue a career in food service. Helping out in the kitchen lead to the Culinary Institute of America and then cooking in the real world. He has worked in a Country Club, resorts and hotels, retail restaurants and most recently a major university hospital kitchen. Writing interests are mostly food related, especially food history but also language, politics business and economics.

Transgenic crops are those plants that have been artificially inserted instead of getting them by pollination. The inserted gene is denominated as transgene, may come from a completely different species or from an unrelated plant, for example, some produces its own insecticide, contains a gene from bacterium. Plants containing transgenes are frequently called Genetically Modified or GM Crops. In reality all crops have been genetically modified from their original state by domestication, selection and controlled breeding over periods of time. There are some advantages and disadvantages with this technology; to weight pluses and minuses one must evaluate a...

Bibliography: CHEFSREF. OUR FUTURE OF GENETICALLY ENGINEERED FOOD. 09 February 2012. 22 July 2012 <http://chefsref.hubpages.com/hub/OUR-FUTURE-OF-GENETICALLY-ENGINEERED-FOOD>.
He grew up in the White Mountains of N.H. Local inns and chefs inspired me to pursue a career in food service. Helping out in the kitchen lead to the Culinary Institute of America and then cooking in the real world. He has worked in a Country Club, resorts and hotels, retail restaurants and most recently a major university hospital kitchen.
Writing interests are mostly food related, especially food history but also language, politics business and economics.
Transgenic crops are those plants that have been artificially inserted instead of getting them by pollination. The inserted gene is denominated as transgene, may come from a completely different species or from an unrelated plant, for example, some produces its own insecticide, contains a gene from bacterium. Plants containing transgenes are frequently called Genetically Modified or GM Crops. In reality all crops have been genetically modified from their original state by domestication, selection and controlled breeding over periods of time. There are some advantages and disadvantages with this technology; to weight pluses and minuses one must evaluate a combination of environmental, economic, scientific, and food safety issues.
PROS and CONS of Transgenic crops: Economic Considerations.
Improved Crop Productivity in Poor Areas
The ability to boost agricultural production for poor populations and/or in poor soil or difficult growing climates is one of the stated goals of many plant researchers engaged in this work. A 2003 book edited by Nicholas Kalaitzandonakes, The Environmental and Economic Impacts of Agbiotech: A Global Perspective suggests that some progress toward increased productivity has been made. The book, which compiled a variety of research papers, found that insect-resistant and herbicide-tolerant technologies are reducing the risk of crop losses.
In addition, progress is being made toward developing transgenic varieties that are drought-tolerant (especially important for parts of Africa); UV-tolerant (able to withstand the sun 's ultraviolet radiation at high elevations in the Andes or Himalayas); or virus-tolerant.
POTENTIAL to PRODUCE MEDICINES INEXPENSIVELY
Transgenic plants have the potential to produce pharmaceuticals at modest expense. Currently, transgenic bacteria produce most of the insulin to meet the needs of diabetics in the United States. In a similar vein, plants could be used to grow vaccine ingredients. For more information http://www.maizecdna.org/ on biopharma, visit this link. (The Maize Full Length cDNA Project)
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