Approach to Mis

Topics: SQL, Database, Microsoft Pages: 16 (5950 words) Published: November 10, 2010
Approach to Management Information System Design Joseph George Caldwell, PhD March, 1993; updated 29 April 2009 © 1993, 2006, 2009 Joseph George Caldwell. All Rights Reserved. Posted at http://www.foundationwebsite.org . Contents Overview of Approach to Management Information System (MIS) Design.......................................1 Systems Analysis..............................................................................................................................2 Systems Design ................................................................................................................................2 Systems Implementation...................................................................................................................6 System Operation and Support.........................................................................................................7 References........................................................................................................................................7

Overview of Approach to Management Information System (MIS) Design A classical systems and software engineering approach is recommended to assure the development of a management information system that is fully responsive to a client's performance objectives and resource constraints. This approach includes the following major components: o Systems analysis, which includes information needs assessment, requirements analysis, and requirements specification o Systems design, which includes synthesis of alternatives, cost-effectiveness analysis of alternatives, specification of criteria for selecting a preferred alternative, selection of a preferred alternative, top-level design, and detailed design o Systems implementation, which includes forms development, specification of data collection and entry procedures, development of editing and quality control procedures, software coding and testing, development of training materials and training, integration of the software components with other system components (e.g., personnel, communications, data transfer and assembly, report preparation and distribution, feedback), and system-level testing o Systems operation and support, which includes not only routine operating procedures but also provision for on-going system financing and management, quality control, software maintenance and updating, personnel training, and system maintenance and improvement (including periodic review of system performance and diagnosis and correction of problems) While the preceding system development phases are completed in sequence, there is some time overlap between them. The following paragraphs discuss aspects of each of the above major components. Our approach to management information system design is based on the modern

software/system engineering discipline, which consists of structured analysis and structured design (top-down design). (See the list of references for several books on the modern systems and software engineering discipline.) The first step in an MIS development task is the development of an MIS management plan, which describes the major tasks and schedule of work for the MIS activity.

Systems Analysis
Systems analysis includes a review of the present information system to assess its capabilities and shortcomings; specification of system goals, objectives, and constraints; a survey of potential system users to assess their information needs; identification and analysis of alternative system concepts; specification a system concept; and system requirements analysis and specification. This phase includes an analysis of major system functions and the development of a system architecture (identification of the major system components and their interrelationships). Heavy emphasis is placed on end-user requirements. It is essential to involve the end-user in the system requirements activity, to insure the development of a system that is fully...

References: on Java include Sams Teach Yourself Programming with Java in 24 Hours 4th edition by Rogers Cadenhead (Sams, 2006); Sams Teach Yourself Java 2 in 21 Days 4th edition by Rogers Cadenhead and Laura Lemay (Sams, 2004); Java 2 Unleashed by Stephen Potts, Alex Pestrikov and Mike Kopack (Sams, 2002); J2EE 1.4 The Big Picture by Solveig Haugland, Mark Cade and Anthony Orapallo
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(Prentice Hall, 2004); Sams Teach Yourself J2EE in 21 Days by Martin Bond, Debbie Law, Andy Longshaw, Dan Haywood, and Peter Roxburgh (Sams, 2004). If you are planning to use open-source (free) software (which I don’t recommend) such as MySQL, you will need a whole library on development tools. First, if you are involved with open-source systems, you will probably not be using the Microsoft Windows operating system – you will be using an open-source version of Unix. Reference on current popular open-source operating sytems include: Moving to Linux Kiss the Blue Screen of Death Goodbye! 2nd edition by Marcel Gagné (Addison-Wesley, 2006); The Official Ubuntu Book by Benjamin Mako Hill and Jono Bacon, Corey Burger, Jonathan Jesse, and Ivan Krstić (Prentice Hall, 2007); SUSE Linux 10 Unleashed by Michael McCalister (Sams, 2006); Red Hat Fedora 4 Unleashed by Andrew Hudson, Paul Hudson, Bill Ball and Hoyt Duff (Sams, 2005); Red Hat Fedora and Enterprise Linux 4 Bible by Christopher Negus (Wiley 2005); A Practical Guide to Red Hat Linux 2nd edition by Mark G. Sobell (Prentice Hall, 2005); Knoppix Pocket Reference by Kyle Ranking (O’Reilly, 2005). If you are using open-source software, you will probably be using the complete “LAMP” suite, which consists of Linux operating system, Apache web server, and PHP and MySQL for webbased databases. The open-source Java integrated development system is Eclipse; a reference is The Java Developer’s Guide to Eclipse 2nd edition by Jim D’Anjou, Scott Fairbrother, Dan Kehn, John Kellerman and Pat McCarthy (Addison-Wesley, 2005). Books on the LAMP suite include the following: Beginning MySQL by Robert Sheldon and Geoff Moes (Wiley/Wrox, 2005); MySQL: The Definitive Guide to Using, Programming and Administering MySQL 4.1 and 5.0 3rd edition by Paul DuBois (Sams, 2005); PHP & MySQL by Vikram Vaswani (McGraw-Hill/Osborne, 2005); Web Database Applications with PHP and MySQL by Hugh E. Williams and David Lane (O’Reilly, 2004); PHP and MySQL for Dynamic Web Sites 2nd edition by Larry Ullman (Peachpit Press, 2005); PHP and MySQL Web Development 3rd edition by Luke Welling and Laura Thomson (Sams, 2005); Sams Teach Yourself PHP, MySQL and Apache All in One by Julie C. Meloni (Sams, 2005); MySQL and JSP Web Applications by James Turner (Sams, 2002); Tomcat: The Definitive Guide by Jason Brittain and Ian F. Darwin (O’Reilly, 2003); Ant: The Definitive Guide 2nd edition by Steve Holzner (O’Reilly, 2002, 2005); Apache: The Definitive Guide 3rd edition by Ben Laurie and Peter Laurie (O’Reilly, 2003, 1999,1997); Professional Apache Tomcat 5 by Vivek Chopra, Amit Bakore, Jon Eaves, Ben Galbraith, Sing Li, and Chanoch Wiggers (Wiley/Wrox, 2004); Struts in Action: Building Web Applications with the Leading Java Framework by Ted Husted, Cedric Dumoulin, George Franciscus and David Winterfeldt (Manning Publications, 2003); Sams Teach Yourself HTML and CSS in 24 Hours 7th edition by Dick Oliver and Michael Morrison (Sams, 2006); No Nonsense XML Web Development with PHP by Thomas Myer (SitePoint, 2005); Sams Teach Yourself Networking in 24 Hours 3rd edition by Joe Habraken and Matt Hayden (Sams, 2004); Beginning Perl 2nd edition by James Lee with Simon Cozens and Peter Wainwright (Apress, 2004); CGI Manual of Style by Robert McDaniel (Ziff-Davis, 1996). On the surface, it may seem that it is a great idea to use an open-source suite, such as LAMP, instead of a proprietary system such as Microsoft operating system and Access or SQL Server. Most of my experience in database development has been using Microsoft Access. The only time I used Informix was to convert a very unhappy Informix user to Access. The problem with MySQL is that the user has to use the SQL programming language. Working with MySQL after working with Access is like returning to the Dark Ages. Access has very easy-to-use graphics-based tools for constructing and modifying tables, queries and reports, whereas in MySQL it is necessary to use SQL directly to do these things. While this may be fine for the skilled programmer who is setting things up for permanent use (e.g., a web-based application that allows a few simple predetermined queries), it is frightening to the non-programmer who wishes to construct an ad-hoc query and must do it using SQL. Another drawback of open systems, in a developing-country 10
setting, is that more people are trained in Microsoft products, and they do not see that becoming involved in open-source work enhances their careers.
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