Ap Euro Dbq

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What are the roots of the modern European era?

There were countless political, social and economic events that unfolded in the Middle Ages that could be said to be the roots of the Modern European Era...; such as the Black Death, the Hundred Years' War, the Great Schism, the Reformation of the Church, peasant rebellions, so on and so forth. However, most all of these events were the seeds of broader effects. They brought on such values as Capitalism, Nationalism, Humanism, the rise of the middle class. The events early events in the Middle Ages such as the Black Plague and Great Schism also started to waver people's ideas of religion, causing doubt in the church, and a rather dogmatic system beliefs in religion, focusing on doing good purely to attain salvation. Eventually, through cause and effect reformations, began to take place, including Erasmus, Christian Humanists, Zwingli, Calvin, Martin Luther, etc. who all heavily impacted different branches of Christianity in the Modern Era. These new differences in religion also gave a sense of Nationalism. Roots of Modern Europe lie in the Middle Ages, as well as the Classical period of time. The Roman/Greek ideals were becoming popular once more
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In his opinion, religion should be inner piety; your own love and dedication to God, not that of the church. Luther believed that indulgences were a disgrace to religion. The beliefs stemming from the church, that in order to earn salvation, one had to pay money, or have specific requests, was ludicrous. Justification should be achieved by doing good deeds and having faith in God. Martin Luther completed his 95 theses, which communicated his ideas of what religion should look like. Gutenberg's printing press helped spread these ideas, even though Luther's works were banned and burned in the Holy Roman

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