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AP United States History
Course Long Plan

Course Description

This course examines the major political, diplomatic, social, cultural, and economic developments in the United States from Pre-Columbian times to the present. It is a survey class that prepares the student to take the Advanced Placement examination in United States History in May of the junior year. The district has created a two year program because the high school is on a modified AB 4 x 4 block schedule. Additionally, district National History Day requirements are incorporated into the sophomore year. Further, during the first year a significant amount of time is spent instructing students on essay preparation and how to analyze historical documents. Review sessions are held each summer. Year one of the program ends at Unit 10. The junior year begins with unit 11 and culminates in May when the student takes the Advanced Placement test.

The course is chronological and thematic and addresses the major themes of United States History as outlined in the AP Course Description booklet. These themes include: American diversity and identity, American culture, demographic patterns, economic, political, and social transformations and institutions, religious development, social reform movements, slavery and its consequences, environmental and global considerations, and war and diplomacy.

The course provides extensive instruction in historical content encompassing all National Council for Social Studies America History Standards. It also focuses on providing students with the analytic skills necessary to deal critically with a wide variety of primary source material including, documents, statistics, pictorials, and maps. A major emphasis of the course will be placed on teaching students the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in essay format.

The Coventry school district has a series of essential questions upon which historical scholarship and historical problems are addressed. These questions serve as guidelines upon which historical information is organized. The Advanced Placement teacher uses the district essential questions to create a rich curriculum which allows students to practice analytical and evaluative methodological approaches to historical inquiry. The essential questions are utilized in each unit as deemed appropriate by instructor. Essential questions are to be found in addendum 1.

In addition to the following course outline, Advanced Placement students are required to participate in National History Day. This assignment gives the student the opportunity to address an historical topic by conducting research in both primary and secondary sources. Preliminary assignments include historical journal article research/analysis, primary source analysis, book reviews, and thesis development. The final presentation may be in the form of a historical paper, exhibit, documentary, or original historical performance. All four entries meet NCSS standards. All entries must include a comprehensive annotated bibliography.

Advanced Placement students are expected to learn and implement the methods of historical inquiry. After considering significant pieces of historical scholarship students will make inferences and draw conclusions. This is accomplished by considering the various conflicting views of many historians, and the time periods they have studied and written about. For example, the study of the colonial period (Unit 2) will present conflicting views of the time period as explained by the “Patrician” school of historians and the “New Left” historians. Numerous chapters in the textbook The American Pageant offer excerpts of historical works (Varying Viewpoints) concerning the historiography of the time period being discussed.

Additionally, most free response essays and DBQs are designed to offer students the opportunity to analyze historical evidence and formulate for themselves an interpretation of the historical event being examined. Further, by way of National History Day, which teaches students to analyze evidence concerning a particular theme of American history, and use of the district’s essential questions, students are required to demonstrate their understanding of historical scholarship. There is also a final requirement for students (To be completed after the AP exam or in the summer between the first and second half of the curriculum). Students are given a choice of historical books and must write a six page critical book review which encompasses histriographical concerns.

Unit 1: Pre-Columbian to 1700 Founding the New Nation

Unit Overview: The emphasis of this unit is on the meeting of three worlds - Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans. Comparative characteristics of societies in the Americas, Western Europe, and Western Africa that increasingly interacted after 1450 are examined in detail.

Standards: NCSS History Standards: Era 1 Three World’s Meet (Beginnings to 1620) 1A, 1B, 1C, 1D, 2A, 2B Era 2 Colonization and Settlement 1A, 1B, 2A, 2B

Themes addressed: American diversity, culture, slavery, demographic changes, economic transformation, environment, globalization and war

Content areas:
1. Early inhabitants of the Americas
2. American Indian empires in Mesoamerica, the Southwest & Mississippi Valley
3. American Indian cultures of North America at the time of European contact
4. First European contacts with Native Americans (Columbus)
5. Columbian exchange
6. Rivalries and Colonial policies of the Spanish, French, Dutch, and English and their effect on the cultures of the New World
7. The development and ramifications of slavery in the New World
8. Colonial establishment (religion / economic / social / diplomatic)
9. The differences between the Jamestown and Plymouth colonies in terms of objectives, type of settlers, early problems and reasons for success;
10. Religious diversity in the American colonies;
11. The reasons for the founding of each of the original 13 colonies and the West Indian provinces;
12. The expansion of the original settlements and the influence of the frontier on the colonists
13. The early economic, religious, and political factors in the colonies that tended to produce sectional differences

Instructional Strategies: Power Point presentation / lecture/note-taking, interactive map activities using smart board graphic organizers, document analysis, evaluate and analyze historical scholarship

Major Assignments :
Text : The American Pageant
Chapter 1 New World Beginnings
Chapter 2 The Planting of English America
Chapter 3 Settling the Northern Colonies
Map assignment: Columbian Exchange(students create an interactive map/technology)
Map skills - locate and identify the original 13 colonies, major settlements, geographic features; distinguish among the New England, Middle, and Southern regions
Varying Viewpoints : Europeanizing America or Americanizing Europe
Debate the historical scholarship of Bernard Bailyn and David Hackett Fisher.
Examine excerpts of Ramon Gutierrez’s When Jesus Came, The Corn Went Away (1991) and Edmund S. Morgan’s American Slavery, American Freedom

Additional Resources:
First Encounters
The Meaning of America , 1493 , by Christopher Columbus
Utilizing the Native Labor Force , 1492 , by Christopher Columbus
New World Fantasies , 1516 , by Thomas More
Labor Needs , 1518 , by Alonso de Zuazo
The Black Legend , 1542 , by Bartolomé de las Casas
A Critique of the Slave Trade , 1587 , by Fray Tomas de Mercado www.choices.edu Slavery in New England

Assessment Options:
Option 1: Multiple assessments found in Bailey The American Pageant 13th Edition Teacher Resources including: multiple choice, identifications, cause and effect, and free response essays
Option 2: DBQ: 1993 AP ----Although the New England and Chesapeake region were both settled largely by people of English Origin, by 1700 the regions had evolved into two distinct societies. Why did this difference in development occur?
Option 3: Explain how the English colonies in the New world were different from one another in terms government, population, and origin.
Option 4: Examine historical scholarship (Varying Viewpoints) to debate and answer district essential question # 2 What is the impact of global and cultural exchange on various societies?

Unit 2: American Life in the Seventh Century 1607 -1763

Unit Overview: The second unit explores differences in geography, the economy and the population, as well as the common concerns of the British New World Empire and their relationship to themselves, the “mother country”, Native Americans and other North American colonies. The unit explores the development of an “American identity”.

Standards: NCSS History Standards: Era 2 Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763) 2A, 2B, 2C

Themes addressed: American diversity and identity, American culture, demographic patterns, economic, political, and social transformations and institutions, religious development, social reform movements, slavery and its consequences, global considerations, and war and diplomacy

Content areas:
1. the sources of colonial labor, including indentured servants, women and imported Africans;
2. Interactions with Native American population
3. immigration patterns and their effect on colonial development
4. how the colonial population grew and diversified;
5. patterns of commercial and agricultural developments of the colonies;
6. the emergence of the plantation system and its impact on southern society;
7. the New England witchcraft episode as a refection of the Puritan society;
8. the reasons for the appearance of a variety of religious sects in the colonies, and the effects of the Great Awakening on the colonists;
9. the beginnings of colonial industry and commerce and the early attempts at regulation by Parliament;
10. the ways in which colonial literature, education, science, law and justice were diverging from their English antecedents;
11. impact of the Enlightenment on the colonies;
12. emergence of a particularly American "mind and spirit”
13. colonial government and imperial policy in British North America

Instructional Strategies: Power Point presentation / lecture notes / graphic organizer (compare and contrast charts) / map assignments / evaluate and analyze historical scholarship

Major Assignments:
Text: The American Pageant
Chapter 4 American Life in the Seventeenth Century
Chapter 5 Colonial Society on the Eve of Revolution
Write short scripts to be performed for the class (Salem Witch Trials)
Text Based Discussion : The Silencing of Mary Dyer
Varying Viewpoints: Colonial America: Communities of Conflict or Consensus?
Examine excerpts from Richard Bushman’s From Puritan to Yankee (1967), Gary Nash’s The Urban Crucible , Christine Heyrman’s Commerce and Culture and Edmund S. Morgan’s American Slavery, American Freedom

Additional Resources:
The Great Awakening , 1743
Mercantilist Ideas , 1664 , by Thomas Munn
Indentured Servitude , 1656 , by John Hammond
Mounting Conflict with Native Americans , 1634 , by John Winthrop
The Schenectady Massacre , 1689/90 , by Robert Livingston
Us and Them: A History of Intolerance in America: The Silencing of Mary Dyer
Primary Source: Examining An Indentured Servants Contract (from text)
Our Nations Archives: Sinners in the Hands of An Angry God - Jonathon Edwards A New Refinement In Cruelty - Olaudah Esquiano

Assessment Options:
Option 1: Multiple assessments found in Bailey The American Pageant 13th Edition Teacher Resources including: multiple choice, identifications, cause and effect, and free response essays
Option 2: DBQ J. Wetson’s Walch’s Document Based Assessment Activities for U.S. History Classes
1.) The Colonial Period: Economic Opportunities
Americans often pride themselves that theirs is a “land of opportunity.” How much economic opportunity truly did exist in colonial America, and what factors affected the colonists’ opportunities to succeed?
Option 3: What role did religion play in the establishment of English colonies in North America?
Option 4: Analyze Historical Scholarship --- debate the works of historians Bushman / Nash / Heyrman and Morgan to evaluate and develop thesis statements for district essential question # 8
Does America’s government continually meet the needs of its ever-changing citizenry?

Unit 3: The Dual for North America and the American Revolution 1608 – 1783

Unit Overview: This unit discusses the causes of the American Revolution, the ideas and interests involved in forging the revolutionary movement and the reason for America’s victory. Further, the impact of the American Revolution on politics, the economy and society, with an emphasis placed on those groups not fully accepted into late 18th century society, is discussed.

Standards: NCSS History Standards: Era 3 Revolution and the New Nation (1754 – 1820s) 1A, 1B, 1C, 2A, 2B, 2C

Themes Addressed: American diversity and identity, American culture, demographic patterns, economic, political, and social transformations and institutions, religious development, social reform movements, slavery and its consequences, global considerations, and war and diplomacy

Content Areas:
1. Colonial attitudes toward England and toward other colonies before the French & Indian War;
2. Causes and consequences of the French & Indian War, and the status of the colonies within the British Empire;
3. Options for dealing with the colonies available to the British in 1763, and the reasons for adopting the policies that they chose to implement;
4. The importance of the series of crises from the Sugar Act through the Coercive Acts, and how each crises changed colonial attitudes toward the mother country;
5. the significance of the convening of the First Continental Congress, and what it accomplished Content and/or Skills Taught:
6. The historical debate concerning the nature of the American Revolution and the reasons for disagreement
7. American war aims and the problems experienced by the revolutionary governments in carrying on a protracted war;
8. The aim of the Declaration of Independence, the reasons for its issuance and its influence throughout the world since 1776;
9. The diplomatic triumph for American negotiators in the Treaty of Paris;
10. How the American Revolution was not only a war for independence, but also a struggle to determine the nature of the nation being created
11. The impact of the Revolution on women, African-Americans, native Americans and other minorities;
12. The types of governments created by the new states and the important features of their governments
13. The features of the Articles of Confederation, the problems faced by the government as a result of its weaknesses and how they were addressed

Instructional strategies: Political cartoon analysis Power point/ lecture and notes Debate (radicals, conservatives, and moderates), Graphic organizers, Cause and effect flowchart, and paraphrasing the Declaration of Independence, Interactive map analysis, evaluate and analyze historical scholarship

Major Assignments:
Text The American Pageant
Chapter 6 The Dual for North America
Chapter 7 The Road to Revolution
Chapter 8 America secedes from Empire
Chapter 9 The Confederation and the Constitution
Free Response Essays ( Select two --- one done as a take home / one in class)
(1)Analyze the following statement: Those Americans who fought as patriots were influenced by two revolutionary impulses: independence from Britain and the desire to democratize American society and government.
(2)The first and second Continental Congresses were shaped by disputes between moderates, radicals and conservatives. Discuss the positions of the three factions and explain which was the most persuasive and effective in achieving its goals.
(3)How justified were Americans in initiating a revolution against Great Britain after nearly 150 years of British administration? In you answer make certain to address the political relationship between Britain and the American colonies.
(4)How prepared were the American colonist to face the economic and military power of Great Britain when war broke out in 1175?
Analyzing Documents (APPARTS Handout)
Varying Viewpoints: Who’s Revolution? Examine excerpts from George Bancroft’s History of the United States of America , J. Franklin Jameson’s The American Revolution Considered as a Social Movement (1926) , Gary Nash’s The Urban Crucible and Edward Countryman’s A People in Revolution (1981)

Additional Resources:
Key Places on April 18-19, 1775 Explore a map and images of a few important locations from historic day that began the American Revolution.
Common Sense This clear-eyed pamphlet outlining the argument for American independence was written by Thomas Paine, although many readers thought it to be the work of John Adams.
The Declaration of Independence (1776) America's most famous document proclaimed independence from King George's monarchy.
John Adams' "Thoughts on Government" Letter (1776) In this letter, ardent patriot and future president John Adams described his views on government and democracy.
John and Abigail Adams
Abigail Adams' "Remember the Ladies" Letter (1776) In her most famous letter, Abigail Adams encourages her husband to consider gender equality as he lays the foundations of the United States government.
The Treaty of Paris 1783 The agreement that officially ended the Revolutionary War with Great Britain named the former colonies as The United States of America.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's 1860 poem, "Paul Revere's Ride" Perhaps the most famous memorial to the events surrounding

Assessment Options:
Option 1: Multiple assessments found in Bailey The American Pageant 13th Edition Teacher Resources including: multiple choice, identifications, cause and effect, and free response essays
Option 2: DBQ --- 2005 AP United States History DBQ
To what extent did the American Revolution fundamentally change American society. In your answer be sure to address the political, social and economic effects of the Revolution in the period 1775-1800. Option 3: Analyze historical scholarship by historian’s Bancroft / Jameson / Nash and Countryman to evaluate and develop a thesis’ statements with supporting graphic organizers for district essential questions 1 What is a Revolution and how does one account for its success? and 3 Why do governments exist?

Unit 4: Building the New Nation and The New Republic 1783 - 1801

Unit Overview: This unit concentrates on the institutions and practices of government created during the Revolution and how they were revised between 1787 and 1801 to create the foundation of the American political system based on the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. Additionally, the challenges faced by the early Republic, the administration of the nation’s first Presidents, and the contentious development of the two party political system are examined.

Standards: NCSS History Standards: Era 3 Revolution and the New Nation 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D

Themes addressed: American diversity and identity, American culture, demographic patterns, economic, political, and social transformations and institutions, slavery and its consequences, global considerations, and diplomacy

Content Areas:
1 .The origins of the Constitutional Convention, including Shay’s Rebellion
2 Delegates and Constitutional Compromises
3 Federalism and how the Constitution is designed to make it work
4. The U.S. Constitution: Articles 1-7 , Bill of Rights, federalism, checks & balances, separation of powers, Limited government ( student is expected to take Civics course at a later date)
5. Washington, Hamilton, and the shaping of the national government;
6 Emergence of political parties: Federalists and Anti-Federalists;
7. Strict construction v. loose construction
8. The ways in which the weak new nation coped with international problems, and the importance of such events as Washington's decision for neutrality and the "quasi-war" with France
9. The Presidency of John Adams

Instructional Strategies : Power point lecture /notes, document analysis, graphic organizer, compare and contrast , evaluate and analysis historical scholarship

Major Assignments:
Text: American Pageant
Chapter 9 The Confederation and the Constitution
Chapter 10 Launching the new Ship of State
Historical newspaper creation / letter to the editor
Debate Federalist vs. Anti Federalist
Analysis James Madison’s Federalist # 10
Examine excerpts from John Fiske’s The Critical Period of American History (1888) , Charles Beard’s An Economic Interpretation of the Constitution (1913) and Gordon Wood’s Creation of the American Republic

Additional Resources:
Debates Within the Constitutional Convention , by Pierce Butler
The Three-Fifth Compromise
Ratification Debates , 1787 , by Edmund Pendleton
Washington's Farewell Address , 1796 , by George Washington
The Quasi-War with France and the XYZ Affair , 1798 , by John Jay
The Whiskey Rebellion , 1794 , by U.S. Congress
From: Our Nation’s Archive
The Late Rising of the People --- Shay’s Rebellion
The Address and Favor of the Constitution --- Benjamin Franklin
The Tree of Liberty must be Refreshed --- Thomas Jefferson
Debating the Need for a Bill of Rights --- James Wilson and John Smilie
The First Inaugural Address --- George Washington

Assessment Options:
Option 1: Multiple assessments found in Bailey The American Pageant 13th Edition Teacher Resources including: multiple choice, identifications, cause and effect, and free response essays
Option 2: 1985 DBQ The 1780s: A Critical Period?
Option 3: Students participate in a mock Constitutional Convention (lesson from History Alive)

Unit 5: The Jeffersonian Era to the Upsurge of Nationalism 1801 – 1824

Unit Overview: American identity and expansion are the two main themes of this unit. United States territorial expansion and the affects on external powers and Native Americans are discussed. The beginning of industrialism, increased immigration, expansion of slavery, the westward movement are themes covered in this unit. Standards: NCSS History Standards: Era 4 Expansion and Reform 1801 – 1861 1A, 1B, 1C

Themes addressed: American diversity and identity, American culture, demographic patterns, economic, political, and social transformations and institutions, religious development, social reform movements, slavery and its consequences, global considerations, and war and diplomacy

Content Areas:
1. The “Revolution of 1800”
2. Thomas Jefferson's views on education, the importance of an agrarian society, the concept of Republican motherhood
3. the concept of American nationalism;
4. the effects of the revolutionary era on religion, and the changing patterns that helped bring on the Second Great Awakening;
5. President Jefferson ‘s contradictory political philosophy and why one “can use one Jefferson to refute another”
6. the Jefferson-Federalist struggle over the judiciary
7. the Louisiana Purchase and the beginning of Manifest Destiny and its impact on Native cultures
8. How the American people and their political system responded to the nation's physical expansion;
9. the causes of the War of 1812,
10. Sectionalism and opposition to the War of 1812
11. the first industrial revolution in the US and the impact this revolution had on American society;
12. the effects of the War of 1812 on banking, shipping, farming, industry, and transportation;
13. the arguments advanced by North and South during the debates over the admission of Missouri, and how they were to influence sectional attitudes; the Compromise of 1820
14. the impact of John Marshall on the status of the federal judiciary; the concept of judicial review
15. the reasons for the Monroe Doctrine and its impact on international relations at the time;
16. how postwar expansion shaped the nation during the "Era of Good Feelings";
17. the presidencies of James Madison and James Monroe

Instructional Strategies: PowerPoint lecture/notes, Examining maps/ PBS video Jefferson , evaluate and analysis historical scholarship --- see William Shaler’s The Road to War

Major Assignments:
Text : American Pageant
Chapter 11 The Triumphs and Travails of Jeffersonian Republic
Chapter 12 The Second War for Independence and the Upsurge of Nationalism
Map assignment Louisiana Purchase
Free Response essay (select one)
(1) Evaluate the presidency of Thomas Jefferson. Include in your answer discussion of Jefferson’s foreign and domestic policies and actions
(2) To what extent did nationalism play a role in the formulation and application of United States foreign policy in the early 19th century?

Additional Resources:
Ask Thomas Jefferson! - A collection of quotes from Thomas Jefferson on a variety of topics.
Liberty Online - online library of Jefferson's writings.
Thomas Jefferson: Third President - A quick biography with links to Jefferson's inaugural addresses and other writings
Judicial Review , 1823 , by John Marshall familiar quotations.
Louisiana, Expansion, and Disunionist Conspiracies , 1803 , by Thomas Jefferson
The Road to War , 1812 , by William Shaler
The "War Hawks" , 1812

Assessment Options:
Option 1: Multiple assessments found in Bailey The American Pageant 13th Edition Teacher Resources including: multiple choice, identifications, cause and effect, and free response essays
Option 2: DBQ What led to the Rise of Political Parties in the 1790s? (Weston Walch, Publisher)

Unit 6: Jacksonian Democracy 1824 – 1837

Unit Overview: The Presidency’s of John Q. Adams and Andrew Jackson are discussed. The extension, restriction and reorganization of American democracy is discussed.

Standards: NCSS History Standards: Era 4 Expansion and Reform 1A, 1B, 3A

Themes Addressed: American diversity and identity, American culture, demographic patterns, economic, political, and social transformations and institutions, religious development, social reform movements, slavery and its consequences, global considerations, and diplomacy

Content Areas:
1. The “corrupt bargain” and the Presidency of John Q. Adams
2. The election of Andrew Jackson and the significance of his victory for the “common man”
3. Andrew Jackson's philosophy of government and his impact on the presidency
4. The nullification theory of John C. Calhoun and the resultant nullification crisis
5. Federal authority and its opponents: the Bank War, tariff controversy and states' rights Debates
6. emergence of the Whig party; a two party system
7. increased participation in the American political system
8. nationalism, states' rights and sectionalism
9. forced removal of American Indians to the trans-Mississippi West

Instructional Strategies: PowerPoint lecture/notes, Graphic organizers, examining primary sources, evaluate and analysis historical scholarship

Major Assignments:
Text The American Pageant
Chapter 13: The Rise of a Mass Democracy 1824 – 1840

Varying Viewpoints : Examine historical analysis from Arthur Schlesinger’s The Age of Jackson , Richard Hofstador’s The American Political Tradition and the Men Who Made It , Marvin Meyers’ The Jacksonian Persuasion , Lee Benson’s The Concept of Jacksonian , Sean Wilentz ‘s Chants Democratic , Charles Sellers’s The Market Revolution: Jacksonian America 1815-1846 and William E. Gienapp’s “The Myth of Class in Jacksonian Democracy” Journal of Public Policy History 6 (1994)

Additional Resources:
Power and Ideology in Jackson's America
Nullification and the Bank War , 1831
Digital History , 1832 , by Andrew Jackson
Andrew Jackson to James A. Hamilton , 1833 , by Andrew Jackson
Andrew Jackson to Moses Dawson , 1834 , by Andrew Jackson

Assessment Options: Option 1: Multiple assessments found in Bailey The American Pageant 13th Edition Teacher Resources including: multiple choice, identifications, cause and effect, and free response essays
Option 2: DBQ 1990 AP Exam : Jacksonian Democrats viewed themselves as the guardians of the United States Constitution, political democracy, individual liberty, and equality of economic opportunity. To what extent do you agree with the Jacksonian's view of themselves?

Unit 7: Transformation of the Economy and Society in Antebellum America (1820-1860)

Unit Overview: The "peculiar institution" of the South and the anti-slavery movement are examined in detail in this unit. The sources and character of cultural, religious and social reform movements in the antebellum period are examined in detail.

Standards: NCSS History Standards: Era 4 Expansion and Reform 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D, 2E, 3B, 4A, 4B, 4C

Themes addressed: American diversity and identity, American culture, demographic patterns, economic, political, and social transformations and institutions, religious development, social reform movements, slavery and its consequences, global considerations, and war and diplomacy.

Content areas:
1. The transportation revolution and creation of a national market
2. The beginnings of industrialization and changes in social and class structure
3. The significance of immigration and their contributions to the U.S. during this period
4. Nativism and assimilation
5. the living and working conditions of both men and women in the northern factory and on the northwestern farm
6. efforts to define the role of women in society and the "cult of domesticity"
7. planters, yeoman farmers, and slaves in the cotton South
8. The economy of the Cotton Kingdom
9. Southern social structure
10. Plantation system and life under slavery
11. The abolitionist crusade and the Northern conscience
12. White Southern response
13. the two basic impulses of nationalism and romanticism, and how each were reflected in the reform movements of the time period;
14. the contributions of a new group of literary figures to American cultural nationalism;
15. the transcendentalists and their place in American society;
16. the sources of American religious reform movements, why they originated where they did; their ultimate objectives, and what their leadership had in common;
17. reform movements - goals, methods, achievements, leaders: temperance, public asylums, public education, women's roles and women's rights; antislavery;

Instructional Strategies: PowerPoint lecture/ notes , primary sources, point of view , evaluate and analysis historical scholarship

Major Assignments
Text The American Pageant
Chapter 14: Forging the National Economy
Chapter 15: The Ferment of Reform and Culture
Chapter 16: The South and the Slavery Controversy
Varying Viewpoints : Examine historical excerpts Michael Katz’s The Irony of Early Schooling in America, Nancy Cott’s The Bound’s of Womenhood: “Women’s Sphere” in New England; 1870 -1835, Lori D. Ginsberg’s Women and the Work of Benevolence, Ulrich Bonnell Phillip’s American Negro Slavery, Stanley Elkins’s Slavery , Lawrence Levine’s Black Culture and Black Consciousness

Additional Resources:
Newspaper Opinions Partisan journalists delivered the news they wanted their readers to hear. Text accompanied by historian video clip, two essays and gallery
Antebellum Women's Rights From abolition to women's suffrage, Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Sojourner Truth took bold stands on reform. Text with video clip available.
Literary Women Through fiction and newsprint, Margaret Fuller, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Lydia Maria Child promoted abolition and women's rights. Text with video clip available.
A Shifting Political Landscape Would new territories and states allow slavery?
We Are of Another Race Englishman Charles Mackay observes Northern attitudes toward African Americans.
A Woman' World: Speaking Out for Women's Equality Sojourner Truth, Sarah Grimke, and Lucy Stone advocate women's rights.
The Horrible Inconsistencies of Slavery in a Christian Nation Excerpt from Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass.
The Christian Constable Excerpt from Harriet Jacobs' Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl.
Narrative and Testimony of Sarah M. Grimké , 1839 , by Weld
The Bible Argument , 1860 , by Thornton Stringfellow
The Education, Labor, and Wealth of the South , 1860 , by Samuel A. Cartwright
Cotton Is King and Pro-Slavery Arguments , 1860 , by E.N. Elliott

Assessments Options:
Option 1: Multiple assessments found in Bailey The American Pageant 13th Edition Teacher Resources including: multiple choice, identifications, cause and effect, and free response essays
Option 2: DBQ What forces or ideas motivated and inspired this effort to remake and reform American society during the antebellum (J. Weston Walch, Publisher)
Option 3: Prepare and deliver a speech by a member of one of the reform movements
Option 4: Analyze the historical scholarship of Katz, Cott, Ginsberg, Phillip, Elkins, and Levine to develop a thesis and answer district essential question # 4 How does the advancement of society facilitate change?

Unit 8: Sectionalism and Crisis of Union (1818-1860)

Unit Overview: The causes of the Civil War, including territorial expansion, Lincoln’s election as President, and the abolitionist movement (both radical and moderate) are examined. The debate over the extension of slavery, and the political systems which supported both sides of the debate are highlighted.

Standards: NCSS History Standards: Era 4 Expansion and Reform 1B, 1C, 2C, 2D, 2E, 3B, 4A, 4B

Themes addressed: American diversity and identity, American culture, demographic patterns, economic, political, and social transformations and institutions, religious development, social reform movements, slavery and its consequences, environmental and global considerations, and war and diplomacy

Content Areas:
1. Manifest Destiny and its influence on Euro-Americans and Native-Americans
2. The origin of the Republic of Texas and the controversy concerning its annexation by the United States
3. The Mexican War
4. How the question of slavery deepened divisions between the North and South, ending the long tradition of compromise over the issue
5. The impact of the Wilmot Proviso on the sectional controversy
6. The Compromise of 1850 and popular sovereignty
7. the role of the major political parties in the widening sectional conflict
8. The Fugitive Slave Law and the Dred Scott Decision.
9. The Lincoln Douglas debates
10. John Brown’s raid on Harpers Ferry
11. Abraham Lincoln's victory in 1860 and the effect of his election on the sectional crisis
12. Secession

Instructional strategies: lecture/notes, document analysis, examining a court case, evaluate and analysis historical scholarship

Major Assignments:
Text The American Pageant
Chapter 17 Manifest Destiny and Its Legacy
Chapter 18 Renewing the Sectional Struggle
Chapter 19 Drifting Toward Disunion
Map Assignment (select one) (1) Review the three maps showing the nation's changing policies toward slavery in the territories between 1820 and 1854. (a) What were the three acts of Congress that marked these changing policies, and when did they take place? (b) How did the last of these acts undo the compromise achieved in the first one? (2) Using a photocopy of a map of the United States, label the following locations. Next to each label, briefly explain its importance in events leading to the Civil War. Kansas Territory Illinois Washington, D.C. Richmond, Virginia Harpers Ferry, Virginia Fort Sumter, South Carolina
Varying Viewpoints: Examine historical excerpts from Charles and Mary Beard’s The Rise of American Civilization , Allan Nevins’ The Ordeal of Union , David Potter The Impending Crisis , Eric Fonner’s Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men and Michael Holt’s The Civil War and Reconstruction Additional Resources:
Manifest Destiny
Bleeding Sumner , 1856 , by Charles Sumner
The Dred Scott Decision , 1857 , by Roger Taney
The Gathering Storm , 1857 , by Hinton Rowan Helper
Astounding Disclosures! , 1858 , by Robert Goodenow
Facts for the People , 1858 , by Abraham Lincoln
Facts for the People , 1858 , by Abraham Lincoln
Facts for the People , 1858 , by Abraham Lincoln
Facts for the People , 1858 , by Abraham Lincoln
Speech Delivered in Springfield , 1858 , by Abraham Lincoln
Harpers Ferry , 1887 , by Annie Brown Adams
Address of John Brown to the Virginia Court... , Undated but probably December 1859 , by John Brown
Stephen A. Douglas to N. Prescott , 1860 , by Stephen A. Douglas
The Secession Crisis , 1860
The Underground Railroad Slaves who fled risked the hardships of fugitive life, the danger of capture, and even the threat of death. Text with map, images and video clip..
A Shifting Political Landscape Would new territories and states allow slavery?
A War Begins Read New York and South Carolina newspaper reports on the outbreak of war in 1861.
Responses to John Brown's Raid at Harper's Ferry Cincinnati and Chicago papers offer up their opinions on the Harper's Ferry affair -- and the looming conflict between free and slave states.
The Political Economy of Slavery Edmund Ruffin makes a pro-slavery argument.
Results of the Fugitive Slave Act Harriet Jacobs describes how this legislation tears families apart.
Excerpts from letters, speeches, and an editorial
Political Party Timeline Trace the intricate relations of the major parties, and the disappearance of the Whigs.
Timeline of John Brown's Life

Assessment Options:
Option 1: Multiple assessments found in Bailey The American Pageant 13th Edition Teacher Resources including: multiple choice, identifications, cause and effect, and free response essays
Option 2: DBQ (select One) 1982 or 2005 AP
(1) John Brown’s raid on the federal armory at Harpers Ferry, Virginia , in October 1859, involved only a handful of abolitionists, freed no slaves, and was over in two days. Although many northerners condemned the raid, by 1863 John Brown had become a hero and martyr to the North. To what extent and in what ways do the views about John Brown illustrate changing North-South relations between 1859 and 1863?
(2)In the early nineteenth century, Americans sought to resolve their political disputes through compromise, yet by 1860 this no longer seemed possible. Analyze the reasons for this change. Use the documents, your knowledge of historical scholarship, and your knowledge of the period (1820-1860) to answer the aforementioned statement.

Unit 9: The Civil War and Reconstruction (1860-1877)

Unit Description: The course and character of the Civil War and its effects on the America people are examined. Additionally, the various Reconstruction plans, and their political ramifications on various groups of society (freedman) are considered. The question of Reconstruction’s success or failure is debated.

Standards: NCSS History Standards: Era 5 Civil War and Reconstruction 1, 2A, 2B, 3A, 3B, 3C

Themes addressed: American diversity and identity, American culture, demographic patterns, economic, political, and social transformations and institutions, religious development, social reform movements, slavery and its consequences

Content areas:
1. The South’s attempt at secession and the response of the United States government
2. Two societies at war: mobilization, resources, industrial potential, and public support; and internal dissent
3. military strategies and foreign policy
4. how the North won the war
5. the considerations involved in President Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation, and its reception in the North in the South, and in Europe
6. The structure of the government under the Confederate States of America
7. Central ideas contained in the Gettysburg Address
8. social, political, and economic effects of the war in the North, South, and the West
9. Presidential and Radical Reconstruction and the reasons for the eventual Radical domination
10. The Constitutional Crisis in the impeachment case of Andrew Johnson and the significance of his acquittal for the future of Reconstruction
11. Radical Reconstruction in practice and Southern (black and white) reaction to it
12. The debate over the success or failure of Reconstruction
13. The role of African-Americans in politics, education, and the economy
14. The reconfiguration of southern agriculture: sharecropping and crop lien system
15. the methods used in the South to regain control of its affairs and the course of action it chose thereafter;
16. The politics of segregation: Jim Crow and disenfranchisement
17. The Bargain of 1877 and the end of Reconstruction ( effects on freedman)

Instructional Strategies: lecture/notes, analyzing a document/identifying central issues - The Gettysburg Address, evaluate and analysis historical scholarship

Major Assignments:
Text The American Pageant
Chapter 20: Girding for War: The North and the South
Chapter 21: The Furnace of Civil War
Chapter 22: The Ordeal of Reconstruction
Map Assignment/ Reconstruction
Examining political Cartoons/ Reconstruction
Varying Viewpoints: Examine historical excerpts from James M. McPherson’s Battle Cry of Freedom , Eric Foner’s Reconstruction: America’s Unfinished Revolution, 1863-1877 and Nothing But Freedom, Michael Holt’s The Civil War and Reconstruction , Steven Hahn’s A Nation Under Feet , W.E.B. Du Bois’s Black Reconstruction , Kenneth Stamp’s and Leon Litwack’s Reconstruction: An Anthology of Revisionist Writings

Additional Resources:
African Americans The Emancipation Proclamation invited slaves to enlist in the Union cause. Read about the fighting efforts of African Americans across the South.
The Foot Soldier Follow a Confederate and a Union soldier into battle. Six clips.
The Camera Goes to War Browse a gallery of historic photographs, and learn about the people behind the lens.
Gallery: Cartoons about Ulysses S. Grant Browse pro- and anti-Grant political cartoons, spanning his military and political careers, and investigate the range of popular opinions about Grant and the major issues of his time.
Timeline: Ulysses S. Grant's Life
Cyrus F. Boyd: A Union Soldier at Shiloh Cyrus Boyd used the daily notes he'd kept to write about his wartime experience, in the form of a journal. In this excerpt from the unpublished journal he tells about his experience in the battle of Shiloh.
Henry Morton Stanley: A Confederate Soldier at Shiloh Nineteenth century foreign correspondent Henry Morton Stanley remembers his experience as a confederate soldier in the battle of Shiloh
Northerners in the South: Q&A - Rebuilding the South after the War Historians explain the problems of rebuilding a region destroyed by war.
The Negro Question: Thomas Nast's Political Cartoons
Forty Acres and a Mule: Q&A - Southern Violence during Reconstruction Historians describe the violent conditions that prevailed in the South
Plantations in Ruins: Video This is a collection of eight short clips from the film that are related to the topic and a mini-documentary about how Southern women faced the realities of war and Reconstruction, finding new roles in the process. (8:11)
Plantations in Ruins: Q&A - The Myths of Reconstruction Historians clear up misconceptions about Reconstruction.
Slave to Sharecropper: Further Reading
Black Legislators: Q&A - Civil Rights during Reconstruction Historians describe the debate over civil rights after the Civil

Assessments Options:
Option 1: Multiple assessments found in Bailey The American Pageant 13th Edition Teacher Resources including: multiple choice, identifications, cause and effect, and free response essays
Option 2: DBQ: What Caused Secession? (J. Weston Walch, Publisher)
Option 3: Comparing North and South/ Graphing the Civil War
Option 4: Construct an essay utilizing the examined historical works which explains which interpretation of Reconstruction you support. Remember to also provide evidence from the historical time period under discussion.

Unit 10: Industrial America and Urban Society in the late 19th Century 1865-1900

Unit Description: The purpose of this unit is to study the transformation of the United States from a nation of self-sufficient farmers and artisans into a technological and industrial leader. The rise of corporations, heavy industry, labor unions and the resultant political, economic and social changes on American society are discussed Standards: NCSS History Standards: Era 6 The Development of the Industrial United States from 1870 - 1900 1A, 1B, 1C, 2A, 3A, 3D

Themes addressed: American diversity and identity, American culture, demographic patterns, economic, political, and social transformations and institutions, social reform movements, global considerations, and war and diplomacy.

Content Areas:
1. Economic and societal conditions (Social Darwinism /Social Gospel) that made rapid industrialization possible
2. corporate consolidation of industry and its ramification on American society
3. Industrialists: Captains of industry or Robber Barons?
4. Technological development and the effects on workers and workplace
5. Critics of big business and reform movements
6. Government attempts to regulate big business;
7. The union movement - origins, leaders, political goals and societal implications
8. Migration and immigration--- black America and Civil Rights initiatives
9. Urbanization and the lure of the city for farmers, immigrants and freedman
10. “growing pains” of the cities --- environment , crime, machine politics
11. intellectual and cultural movements in popular entertainment
12. the growth of an American culture - arts, literature; the appeal of the modern press;

Instructional Strategies: PowerPoint/ lecture/notes, document analysis , Photograph analysis , evaluate and analyze historical works
Major Assignments
Text :American Pageant
Chapter 24 Industry comes of Age
Chapter 25 America Moves to the City
Varying Viewpoints : Examine excerpts from Richard Hofstadter’s Social Darwinism in American Thought, David Montgomery’s The Fall of the House of Labor: The Workplace, the State and American Labor Activism 1865 –1925, Herbert Gutman’s, Work, Culture, and Society in Industrializing America and Power and Culture: Essays on the American Working Class and Philip Foner’s Women and the American Labor Movement

Additional Resources:
Virtual Tour of the Elms The Richest Man in the World: Andrew Carnegie
Millionaire's Row
Rockefellers Timeline
Teachers Guide Study Carnegie's rise to power, interaction with unions, and the Homestead strike.
Teachers Guide What happens to families when they strike it rich? Explore the Rockefellers' business acumen, philanthropy, and controversies

Assessment Options:
Option 1: Multiple assessments found in Bailey The American Pageant 13th Edition Teacher Resources including: multiple choice, identifications, cause and effect, and free response essays
Option 2: 2000 AP DBQ - How successful was organized labor in improving the position of workers in the period from 1875-1900
Option 3: Captains of Industry or Robber Barons? Simulation

Unit 11: The Gilded Age

Unit description: The Gilded Age and how Populist and others proposed solutions to the excesses of that Age are analyzed.
Standards: NCSS History Standards: Era 6 The Development of the Industrial Union 1870-1900 1C, 2A

Themes Addressed: American diversity and identity, American culture, demographic patterns, economic, political, and social transformations and institutions, social reform movements, environmental and global considerations, and war and diplomacy.

Content Areas:
1. development of culture and society in the Gilded Age industrialization and urbanization opened new worlds for both rich and poor; socioeconomic class issues
2. Gilded Age politics - bossism, corruption, the Spoils System;
3. presidential elections (with emphasis on turning point elections- 1876, 1892, 1896) & presidential administrations from 1868-1900;
4. growth of the federal government during the late 19th century;
5. the tariff issue;
6. the money issue - gold v. silver;
7. the change in farming due to industrialism - what factors led to the change and how the interrelation between industrial growth and farming worked;
8. the loss of political influence on the part of the farmer and the political attempts of the farmer - the grange, the alliances, and the Populist Party;
9. economic disasters during the Gilded Age - Panic of 1873, Panic of 1893;
10. governmental involvement in the economy - the Interstate Commerce Act and the Sherman Anti-trust Act

Instructional Strategies: PowerPoint/ Lecture Notes / analyze and evaluate historical scholarship

Major Assignments:
Text American Pageant
Chapter 23 Political Paralysis in the Gilded Age
Varying Viewpoints: Examine excerpts from two different historiographical perspectives— John D. Hicks’ The Populist Revolt and Richard Hofstadter’s The Age of Reform

Additional Resources:
"Cross of Gold", William Jennings Bryan, campaign speech, 1896

Assessment options:
Option 1: Multiple assessments found in Bailey The American Pageant 13th Edition Teacher Resources including: multiple choice, identifications, cause and effect, and free response essays
Option 2: 1983 AP DBQ The Populists

Unit 12: Immigration, the Development of the West, and Populism (1865-1900)

Unit Description: Massive immigration after the Civil War and how new social patterns, conflicts and ideas of national unity developed amid growing cultural diversity. Federal Indian policy and the 19th century struggles of the Native Americans are discussed.

Standards: NCSS History Standards: Era 6 The Development of the Industrial Union 1C, 2A

Themes Addressed: American diversity and identity, American culture, demographic patterns, economic, political, and social transformations and institutions, religious development, social reform movements, slavery and its consequences, environmental and global considerations, and war and diplomacy.

Content Areas:
1. Why did native-born Americans and older immigrants consider the new immigrants so hard to assimilate?; New vs. Old Immigration; push-pull factors; the role of the church in assimilation
2. reality of the west versus the myth of the west; the Turner Thesis and the role of the frontier in American History
3. Expansion and development of western railroads
4. competition for the west --- ranchers, miners, homesteaders, Native Americans
5. government policy towards Native Americans
6. Indian Wars of the late 19th century
7. gender , race and ethnicity in the west
8. environmental impact of the west
9. agrarian discontent -- farmers protest and the grange movement
10. Ignatious Donnelly and the Populists
11. Champion of Populism --- William J. Bryan

Instructional Strategies: PowerPoint/ Lecture, Map Activities, examining primary source material , analyze and historical scholarship
Major Assignments
Text The American Pageant
Chapter 23 Political Paralysis in the Gilded Age
Chapter 26 The Great West and the Agricultural Revolution
Us and Them: Ghost Dance at Wounded Knee
Frederick Jackson Turner’s The Significance of the Frontier in American History v. New Left historian Richard White’s “It’s Your Misfortune and None of My Own:” A New History of the American West
(teacher presented summary / lecture)

Additional Resources:
Native Americans Professor Donald Fixico describes the West before settlement, and the railroad's impact on Native Americans.

Assessment options:
Option 1: Multiple assessments found in Bailey The American Pageant 13th Edition Teacher Resources including: multiple choice, identifications, cause and effect, and free response essays
Option 2: DBQ Bailey Text The Farmers’ Movement, 1870-1900
Option 3: Who is right /Who is wrong? Students debate historians Turner v. White

Unit 13: The Progressive Movement (1890s-1916)

Unit Description: How Progressives and others addressed problems of Industrial capitalism, urbanization and political corruption.

Standard: NCSS History Standards: Era 7 The Emergence of Modern America 1A, 1B, 1C

Themes addressed: American diversity and identity, American culture, demographic patterns, economic, political, and social transformations and institutions, social reform movements, global considerations, and war and diplomacy.

Content Areas:
1. The historical connection between Populism and Progressivism
2. Origins of Progressive reform --- municipal , state and national
1. Roosevelt, Taft and Wilson --- the Progressive Presidents
2. Women and Progressivism, African Americans and Progressivism
3. The muckrakers and their contributions to Progressivism
4. progressivism at the local level – reform of bossism
5. progressivism at the state level – political reforms
6. progressivism at the national level: Theodore Roosevelt --- as “Trust Buster” conservationist, labor–union mediator, Progressive legislation
7. William Howard Taft- trust-buster, conservation, alienation of both progressives and conservatives
8. Election of 1912- the New Nationalism v. the New Freedom; Woodrow Wilson- fighting the triple war of privilege- trusts, tariffs, the treasury system
9. women & progressivism - the winning of the right to vote, 19th Amendment;
10. W.E.B. DuBois, Booker T. Washington and the NAACP

Instructional Strategies: lecture/notes; document analysis, examining political cartoons, analyze and evaluate historical scholarship

Major Assignments:
Text The American Pageant
Chapter 28: Progressivism and the Republican Roosevelt
Chapter 29: Wilsonian Progressivism at Home and Abroad
Interpreting visual sources Jacob Riis : How the Other Half Lives (photograph analysis work sheet from NHD)
Interpreting Political Cartoons (SOAPS Handout)
Who were the Progressives? Examine excerpts from Richard Hofstadter’s Age of Reform, Samuel P. Hays’ The Response to Industrialism and Robert H. Wiebe’s The Search for Order
Women’s role in the Progressive movement --- examine works of historians Robyn Muncy Creating a Female Dominion in American Reform and Theda Skocpol Protecting Soldiers and Mothers

Additional Resources:
The Man With the Muck Rake Roosevelt lashes out against lying political attacks, calling for honesty and sanity in public discourse.
The New Nationalism An explanation of the need for government to regulate capitalism, and provide a square deal for all Americans.
Inaugural Address Roosevelt says that great things are expected of those to whom much has been given.
Progressive Party Platform Third-party Bull Mooses state their positions on the issues of the 1912 election.
Woodrow Wilson's First Inaugural Address TR's 1912 opponent makes his first public address as president.
Political Cartoons TR was easily caricatured in his day. Nine images.
1912 Democratic Party Platforms Official party positions on campaign issues such as labor, tariffs, and anti-trust legislation.
Seventeenth Amendment Read the text of the 17th amendment that allowed for direct popular election of U.S. Senators. Ratified April 8, 1913.
Eighteenth Amendment Read the text of the 18th Amendment that prohibited the sale, manufacture and transportation of intoxicating liquors. Ratified January 16, 1919. Repealed by the Twenty-First Amendment on December 5, 1933.
Nineteenth Amendment Read the text of the 19th Amendment which granted women the right to vote. Ratified August 18, 1920.
Anti-trust/Anti-imperialism
The Republican Circus Political Cartoon
The Republican Pig Pens Political Cartoon
The Trust Giant's Point of View Political Cartoon
Trusts -- The Main Issue Political Cartoon

Assessments Options:
Option 1: Multiple assessments found in Bailey The American Pageant 13th Edition Teacher Resources including: multiple choice, identifications, cause and effect, and free response essays
Option 2: 1989 DBQ on Booker T. Washington & W.E.B. Dubois
Option 3: Complete chart evaluating the administration of Roosevelt, Taft, and Wilson in relation to their records as progressive presidents.

Unit 14: The Emergence of America as a World Power (1867-1914)

Unit Description: The changing role of the United States between 1867 -1914 in world affairs, specifically the debate about imperialism, is discussed.

Standards: NCSS History Standards: Era 7 The Emergence of Modern America 2A, 2B, 2C

Themes Addressed: American diversity and identity, American culture, demographic patterns, economic, political, and social transformations and institutions, social reform movements, slavery and its consequences, global considerations, and war and diplomacy.

Content Areas:
1. literature of expansion - Alfred Thayer Mahan, Josiah Strong, Theodore Roosevelt, Henry Cabot Lodge, Frederick Jackson Turner
2. The arguments of the anti-imperialists: Andrew Carnegie, Jane Addams, Samuel Gompers
3. Gilded Age diplomacy - Alaska, Samoa, and Hawaii annexation
4. John Hay and American relations in China - The Open Door
5. the Spanish-American War – economic, social and diplomatic reasons for
6. America’s First Asian War --- the Philippine Insurrection
7. Theodore Roosevelt as Expansionist
8. William Howard Taft and Dollar Diplomacy
9. Woodrow Wilson and Moral Diplomacy, issues with Mexico

Instructional Strategies: Readings, PowerPoint lecture/notes; map exercises; document analysis , analyze and evaluate historical scholarship

Major Assignments:
Text The American Pageant
Chapters 27 Empire and Expansion
Chapter 28 Progressivism and the Republican Roosevelt
Chapter 29 Wilsonian Progressivism at Home and Abroad
Primary Source Readings (APPARTS Handout)
Varying Viewpoints : Why Did America Become a World Power? Examine excerpts from Howard K. Beale’s Theodore Roosevelt and the Rise of America to World Power.

Additional Resources:
Kipling, “The White Man’s Burden”
Josiah Strong, “Anglo-Saxon Predominance”
William McKinley, “War Message”
Hawaii’s Last Queen, PBS American Experience
Crucible of Empire, The Spanish-American War
Newsies (1992), Daniel Ortega Director, Starring Christian Bale
Assessment Options:
Option 1: Multiple assessments found in Bailey The American Pageant 13th Edition Teacher Resources including: multiple choice, identifications, cause and effect, and free response essays
Option 2: Debating Imperialism and Theodore Roosevelt
Option 3: Text Based Socratic Seminar --In an A.P course, it is expected that all students complete the reading and that they be ready to field questions that come randomly and quickly.

Unit 15: The Great War (1914-1919)

Unit Description: The Great War and the political, social and economic effects on American society are discussed. The emergence of America as a World power is considered. Standards: NCSS History Standards: Era 7 The Emergence of Modern America 2A, 2B, 2C
Themes addressed: Economic, political, and social transformations and institutions, religious development, global considerations, and war and diplomacy.

Content Areas:­­­­­­­­­­­­­­
1. Causes of the Great War - alliances, (Imperialism), arms race (Industrialism), (nationalism), secret alliances, militarism, the spark of war (assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand)
2. Wilson's “neutrality”
3. the Neutrality Period - relationships with belligerents, American neutral rights, unrestricted submarine warfare, Zimmerman Note, America gets drawn into war
4. President Wilson’s 14 Points
5. American mobilization
6. Americans in the War
7. Suppression of Civil Rights? (Espionage and Sedition Acts)
8. The Treaty of Versailles: principle diplomats, treaty specifics, the political fight between President Wilson and Senator Lodge
9. The Treaty of Versailles: Fair to Germany: a precursors to World War II?
10. The 1920 Presidential election: a “Return to Normalcy”?

Instructional Strategies: PowerPoint lecture/notes; map exercises, document analysis , analyze and evaluate historical scholarship

Major Assignments:
Text : The American Pageant
Chapter 29 Wilsonian Progressivism at Home and Abroad
Chapter 30 The War to end War
Primary Sources Reading (APPARTS Handout)
Robert Lansing’s Pro-Ally Tactics (War Memoirs of Robert Lansing)
“We propose an alliance…with Mexico”, The Zimmerman Note
“Neutrality, it now appears, is impracticable”, Woodrow Wilson, War Message April 2, 1917
The Fourteen Points , Wilson’s Address to Congress, January 8, 1918
Varying Viewpoints: Woodrow Wilson: Realist or Idealist? Debating excerpts from George Keenan’s American Diplomacy and Arthur S. Link’s Woodrow Wilson: Revolution, War and Peace

Additional Resources: http://www.indiana.edu/~league/index3.htm League of Nations Photo Archive at Indiana University http://history.acusd.edu/gen/WW2Timeline/1919League2.html Chronology of Wilson's Battle with Congress for the League of Nations 1919-1921 http://www.library.northwestern.edu/govpub/collections/league/ League of Nations Statistics and Disarmament Documents by Northwestern University http://www.pbs.org/greatwar The Great War and the Shaping of the 20th Century by PBS http://www.greatwar.org/index.htm First World War.org http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/nfhtml/ American Leaders Speak: Recordings from World War I and the 1920 Election by the Library of Congress http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/today/jun28.html Today in History: World War I by the Library of Congress http://www.worldwar1.com World War I: Trenches on the Web http://www.lib.byu.edu/~rdh/wwi/ The World War I Document Archive http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/special_report/1998/10/98/ The Great War: 80 Years on by BBC News

Assessment Options:
Option 1: Multiple assessments found in Bailey The American Pageant 13th Edition Teacher Resources including: multiple choice, identifications, cause and effect, and free response essays
Option2: 1991DBQ The Fight Over the Versailles Treaty
Option 3: Mock Trial: Wilson accused of failing to maintain strict neutrality by showing favoritism toward the Allies. Agree or disagree with the following statement: President Wilson had no choice but to enter World War I on the side of the allies.

Unit 16: America Between The Wars 1920 - 1941

Unit Description : How the United States changed from the end of World War I, the causes of the Great Depression, and how the government’s response (New Deal) effected all aspects of American society and transformed American federalism and initiated the welfare state.

Standards: NCSS History Standards: Era 7 The Emergence of Modern America 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D Era 8 The great Depression and World war II 1A,1B,2A,2B,2C

Themes addressed: American diversity and identity, American culture, demographic patterns, economic, political, and social transformations and institutions, social reform movements, slavery and its consequences, environmental and global considerations, and diplomacy.
Content Areas:
1. The 1920 Presidential election --- a “Return to Normalcy”
2. Red Scare - Russian Revolution and American response
3. Labor unrest and unionism
4. The New Black Nationalism
1. The Republican administrations of the 1920s
2. The Business of America and consumerism
3. The culture of modernism --- science, the arts and entertainment
4. The responses to modernism --- Fundamentalism, Nativism and Prohibition
5. The women’s movement of the 1920s
6. Harlem Renaissance, the Beat Generation, the “Hollywoodization” of America
7. Foreign Policy between the Wars
8. Causes of the Great Depression
9. The role of the farmer in the economy
10. The emergence of Franklin D. Roosevelt and the First New Deal (Relief, Recovery and Reform)
11. Good Neighbor Policy
12. Roosevelt's Critics: Conservatives and Socialists
13. FDR and Labor
14. Roosevelt and the Supreme Court
15. The New Deal and Women, African-Americans, Native Americans
16. FDR’s 1930s Neutrality towards the belligerents in Europe
17. American society during the Great Depression

Instructional Strategies: PowerPoint lecture/notes; document analysis, chart (relief, recovery, reform) , analyze and evaluate historical scholarship

Major Assignments:
Text: The American Pageant
Chapter 31 American Life in the Roaring Twenties
Chapter 32 The Politics of Boom and Bust
Chapter 33 The Great Depression and the New Deal
Chapter 34 Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Shadow of War
1920s Speakeasy simulation
Read biographies of William Jennings Bryan and Clarence Darrow. Then choose a partner and write the dialog of a conversation that the two men might have had after the conclusion of the Scopes Trial. They might discuss their respective strategies in the trial, their views regarding the trial's outcome, and each man's expectation of how the issue of teaching evolution would be handled around the country after 1925.
Photography of the Great Depression project
Varying Viewpoints: How Radical Was the New Deal? Recent interpretations as to the “radicalism” of the New Deal by “constraints school” historians. Examine excerpts of Harvard Sitkoff’s Fifty Years Later: The New Deal Evaluated (1985)

Additional Resources:
The Roaring Twenties See the blue-skies optimism of the Roaring Twenties.
Monkey Trial PBS Film
Bryan's Last Speech The speech Bryan never got a chance to deliver at the end of the Scopes trial.
Darrow Before the Bench A plea for the lives of cold-blooded killers Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb
Crash Memories Eyewitnesses and others describe what it was like when the market crashed.
1929 Headlines Read newspaper excerpts from 1929 that reveal investors' boundless optimism.
Tales from the Rails Read the stories of seven teenage hobos, plus tales sent in by web visitors.
New Deal Remedies Read about the government response to the plight of Dust Bowl farmers.
The Dust Bowl map
An Eyewitness Account Read a Kansas wheat farmer's account of how he survived the Dust Bowl.
A Fateful JourneyTrace the paths of nine young black men and two young white women as their fates converged on an Alabama railroad track -- and led to the Scottsboro trials that divided the nation. Flash with non-Flash version available.
Lynching in Alabama
Radio Address on the Banking Crisis The president explains to the American people how his administration will end the banking crisis.
Hoover for Boulder The Boulder Dam was renamed in 1930. The ceremony reveals the competition between Western states for that most precious resource, water.

Assessments Options:
Option 1: Multiple assessments found in Bailey The American Pageant 13th Edition Teacher Resources including: multiple choice, identifications, cause and effect, and free response essays
Option 2: 1991DBQ The Fight Over the Versailles Treaty
Option 3: 1986 DBQ the 1920s
Option 4: 1984 DBQ Hoover and Roosevelt: Liberal or Conservative?

Unit 17: The Shadow of War and World War II 1938 -1945

Unit Description: The causes of World War II, the character of the war at home and abroad and its reshaping of the United States role in world affairs are analyzed

Standards: NCSS History Standards: Era 8 The Great Depression and World War II lA, 1B, 2A, 2B, 2C

Themes addressed: American diversity and identity, American culture, demographic patterns, economic, political, and social transformations and institutions, religious development, social reform movements, slavery and its consequences, environmental and global considerations, and war and diplomacy.

Instructional Strategies: Power Points, lecture , graphic organizers, document analysis , analyze and evaluate historical scholarship

Major Assignments:
Text The American Pageant
Chapter 34 Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Shadow of War
Chapter 35 America in World War II
Examining propaganda project
Map Assignment (war in the Pacific and war in Europe)
Write a letter home from the war
Varying Viewpoints: The Atomic Bombs: Were They Justified? Examine article review of Richard Rhodes’ The Making of the Atomic Bomb

Content Areas:
1. time line of significant foreign policy/diplomatic events of the 1930s
2. the rise of extremist movements in Germany, Italy and Japan
3. Roosevelt’s foreign policy reactions to the Rise of the Dictators --- a policy of neutrality or the arsenal of democracy
4. America’s political response to the war in Europe
5. Roosevelt’s Atlantic Charter
6. At Dawn We Slept --- the attack on Pearl Harbor and America’s Declaration of War
7. The War in Europe and the Pacific – military strategies and engagements, Allied conferences
8. Wartime mobilization of the economy
9. Urban migration and demographic changes
10. Women at War
11. African and Japanese Americans during the war
12. The suppression of civil liberties during World War II
13. The Allied victory and American response
14. The Death of Roosevelt and President Truman
15. The beginning of the Atomic Age --- the Manhattan Project

Additional Resources:
Survivor Interviews Liberated POWs tell their stories in interviews and a newsreel from 1945.
Dispatches Read the stories of soldiers and nurses who were at the Bulge
A Hell on Earth Meet some of the Japanese and Americans who survived total war in the Pacific.
The Costs of War Explore the staggering number of deaths and casualties in the Pacific theater.
"Umi Yukaba" Listen to a Japanese song of allegiance to the emperor.
Maps of the Holocaust Track events in the U.S. and atrocities in Europe.
Philippines Map See the route of the death march and access a brief timeline of the war in the Philippines.
Map: Allied Forces Route View a map of invasion routes and paratrooper drop zones.
World War II in the Pacific Trace Japan's imperial ambitions, and the American military response, in these maps of World War II's Pacific theater.
On the Home Front Read letters sent to and from the anxious families of POWs being held in the Philippines during World War II.
A Survivor of the Palawan Massacre Army private Eugene Nielsen describes the terrible event that motivated the Cabanatuan rescue.
Kill-All Policy A Japanese war minister describes how POW guards should destroy their prisoners.
Voices of D-Day The battle's fliers, the men who landed on Normandy's beaches, and German soldiers tell their stories.
Hot Off the Presses Read a newspaper account and Americans' reactions to news of the D-Day assault.
Letters from the Front Explore first-hand accounts of soldiers' experiences after D-Day.
Pearl Harbor Speech FDR's famous request for Congress to declare war following the Japanese attacks of December 7th -- the "day that will live in infamy."
Propaganda Posters Browse a collection of World War-II era posters.
MacArthur's Speeches: "I Shall Return."
MacArthur's Speeches: Surrender Ceremony on the U.S.S. Missouri
Gallery: Homefront Propaganda in Germany and the U.S.A.
Joseph Goebbels' Diary Track the propagandist's views from 1926 to 1945.
Agreements of the Berlin Potsdam Conference, 1945
Leaflets Dropped on Cities in Japan Warning Civilians of Atomic Bomb, 1945
White House Press Release Announcing the Bombing of Hiroshima, August 6, 1945
Letter from Albert Einstein to FDR About Nuclear Bombs, 1939
Entries from President Truman's Diary, 1945
U.S. Warning to Japan Urging Surrender, 1945
Invade or Bomb? President Truman's diary reveals his feelings about General MacArthur and his concerns about how to end the war.
Battle of the Bulge Soldiers take on Hitler in the brutal winter cold.
Gallery Cartoonist Bill Mauldin captured the everyday experiences of foot soldiers in World War II. View a sampling of his cartoons.

Assessment Options:
Option 1: Multiple assessments found in Bailey The American Pageant 13th Edition Teacher Resources including: multiple choice, identifications, cause and effect, and free response essays
Option 2: 1988 DBQ The Decision to Drop the Atomic Bomb
Option 3: Debate The Decision to Drop the Atomic Bomb

Unit 18: The Cold War Begins and The Eisenhower Era 1945 - 1960

Unit Overview: The development of the Cold War, and the military, economic, social and diplomatic consequences from the end of World War II to the inauguration of John F. Kennedy are considered. The emergence of the modern Civil Rights movement is considered.

Standards: NCSS History Standards: Era 9 Post War United States 1B, 1C, 2A

Themes addressed: American culture, demographic patterns, economic, political, and social transformations and institutions, social reform movements, environmental and global considerations, and war and diplomacy

Content Areas:
1. The Origins of the Cold War
2. The American occupation of Japan
3. President Truman and Containment
4. The Cold War widens --- conflicts in Europe, China, Korea, Vietnam
5. The Korean War
6. Truman's domestic policies
7. The war at home – McCarthyism and the Second Red Scare
8. The Presidential elections of 1948, 1952 and 1956
9. The emergence of the modern Civil Rights movement
10. Domestic polices of Dwight D. Eisenhower – Modern Republicanism
11. Eisenhower and the Soviets – from open skies to massive retaliation
12. The affluent society and “the Other American”
13. Middle Class America, social critics and cultural rebels
14. Changes in science, technology, and medicine

Instructional Strategies: PowerPoint/ Lecture, Map skills , analyze and evaluate historical scholarship

Major Assignments:
Text The American Pageant
Chapter 36: The Cold War Begins
Chapter 37: The Eisenhower Era
Review George F. Keenan’s “long telegram” in Foreign Relations of the United States, 1946, vol. 6 and Eisenhower’s 1961 Farewell Address

Additional Resources:
State of the Union Address, 1955Eisenhower affirms America's anti-communist stance in foreign affairs.
Second Inaugural Address, 1957 Eisenhower affirms the nation's commitment to achieve peace through military, economic, political, and moral strength.
State of the Union Address, 1958 A few months after the Soviet Sputnik launch, Eisenhower emphasizes America's preparedness.
State of the Union Address, 1959 Eisenhower states that lasting peace with the Soviet Union will be possible only if treaties are strengthened by enforcement.
U-2 Incident Official documents record a dialogue between the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. after a U.S. spy plane goes down in Soviet territory.
Malden House Speech by Congressman Richard Nixon Congressman Richard Nixon attacks a suspected American spy.

Assessment Options:
Option 1: Multiple assessments found in Bailey The American Pageant 13th Edition Teacher Resources including: multiple choice, identifications, cause and effect, and free response essays
Option 2: Bailey DBQ Conformity and Turbulence, 1950-1970
Option 3: www.choices.edu Cold War Origins

Unit 19: The Turbulence of the 1960s and 1970s

Unit Overview: This unit spans the administrations of Kennedy, Johnson & Nixon and looks at the three presidencies from both domestic and foreign policy perspectives. A continued discussion of the modern Civil Rights movement is an integral part of this unit.

Standards: NCSS History Standards: Era 9 Post War United States 1945 – 1970s 1A, 1B, 1C, 2B, 2C, 3A, 3B, 4A, 4B, 4C

Themes addressed: American diversity and identity, American culture, demographic patterns, economic, political, and social transformations and institutions, social reform movements, global considerations, and war and diplomacy.

Content Areas :
1. Politics in the 1960s, Presidential elections
2. The Presidencies of Kennedy, LBJ, Nixon, Ford and Carter
3. The emergence of the importance of the media in politics
4. The Soviet-American Cold War struggle
5. The Vietnam quagmire
6. The Civil Rights movement --- successes and failures
7. Foreign policy with the “emerging giant” China
8. The “Imperial Presidency” of Nixon
9. Watergate and the question of Presidential Power

Instructional strategies: Power Point/ lecture/note-taking, map skills -document analysis photo analysis - visual sources from the Vietnam War (NHD photo analysis handout) , analyze and evaluate historical scholarship

Major Assignments:
Text: The American Pageant
Chapter 38 The Stormy Sixties
Chapter 39 The Stalemated Seventies
Varying Viewpoints: The Sixties: Constructive or Destructive? Examine excerpt’s from William O’ Neill’s Coming Apart

Additional Resources:
President Kennedy's Letter to Ngo Dinh Diem The U.S. offers South Vietnam help in defending against the Communist North in this 1961 dispatch
The Tonkin Gulf Incident After reported attacks on U.S. ships in August 1964, President Johnson announces his reasons for making war, and Congress issues a supportive resolution.
Aggression From The North This 1965 State Department paper describes South Vietnam as fighting against a brutal campaign of terror by Communists.
American Policy in Vietnam In April 1965, President Johnson explains American involvement in Vietnam in light of the global Cold War.
Vietnam Veterans Against the War Statement In 1971, veterans ask Congress: "How do you ask a man to be the last man to die for a mistake?"

Assessment Options:
Option 1: Multiple assessments found in Bailey The American Pageant 13th Edition Teacher Resources including: multiple choice, identifications, cause and effect, and free response essays
Option 2: www.choices.edu The Limits of Power: The United States in Vietnam
Option 3: Robert S. McNamara’s The Fog of War

Unit 20: Ronald Reagan, the End of the Cold War, and the Bush Doctrine Unit Overview: Recent developments in foreign and domestic politics including economic, social and cultural changes in the contemporary United States are examined.

Standards: NCSS History Standards: Era 10 Contemporary United States History 1A, 1B, 1C, 2A, 2B

Themes addressed: American culture, economic, political, and social transformations and institutions, global considerations, and war and diplomacy

Content Areas:
1. The Presidencies of Reagan, Bush, Clinton and Bush
2. The end of the Cold War
3. A Conservative Supreme Court?
4. America in the 21st century
5. Has America fulfilled her promise for all Americans?

Instructional strategies: Power Point/ lecture/note-taking, map skills -document analysis photo analysis - visual sources from the Vietnam War (NHD photo analysis handout) , analyze and evaluate historical scholarship

Major Assignments
Text The American Pageant
Chapter 40 The Resurgence of Conservatism
Chapter 41 America Confronts the Post Cold War Era
Chapter 42 The American People Face a New Century

Varying Viewpoints: Where Did Modern Conservatism Come From? Examine the historical literature ( pages 987 -988 in The American Pageant)

Additional Resources:
To Restore America Reagan's challenge to President Gerald Ford for the Republican nomination in 1976.
California and the Problem of Government GrowthAs governor of California, Reagan promises to "put our fiscal house in order."
Acceptance of the Republican Nomination for President Reagan places his trust in the American people as he accepts the Republican nomination in 1980.
First Inaugural "We are a nation that has a government," says the new president, "not the other way around..."
The Economic Recovery Program Reagan proposes his tax cut to Congress.
State of the Union Reagan discusses the federal budget deficit.
Inaugural Reagan advances his agenda for strengthening domestic and foreign policy.
The Challenger Disaster Reagan offers comfort to a grieving nation.
The Campaign Against Drug Abuse "Just Say No to Drugs" is the slogan for a national campaign against drug abuse.
Teacher in Space Vice President George Bush announces Christa McAuliffe as the winner of the Teacher in Space project.
State of the Union Ronald Reagan's first State

Assessment Options:
Option 1: Multiple assessments found in Bailey The American Pageant 13th Edition Teacher Resources including: multiple choice, identifications, cause and effect, and free response essays

Addendum 1 District Essential Questions
1. What is a revolution and how does one account for its success?
2. What is the impact of global and cultural exchange various societies?
3. Why do governments exist?
4. How does the advancement of society facilitate change?
5. Why do people move?
6. Why do nations compete/ cooperate?
7. How does the government work?
8. Does America’s government continually meet the needs of its ever-changing citizenry?
9. Does one group’s expansion necessitate another’s demise?
10. Why do people migrate?
11. Is compromise an effective means of settling disputes?
12. What is geography’s role in the development of America?
13. How did technology affect the cultural and economic development of the U.S. and the world?
14. What rationales do nations use to engage in foreign policy?
15. Are periods of “boom” and “bust” inevitable?
16. Have governments of the 20th century met the need of their citizenry?
17. Does fear and distrust play a role in the development of domestic and foreign policy?
18. What important factors make a nation a “super power”?
19. Does democracy work for all?
20. What role does geography play in the development of nations in the 20th century?
21. How do we explain man’s inhumanity to man?

Addendum 2 Textbook and Resources

Textbooks
(Student use)
Author: Thomas A. Bailey, et. al.
Title: The American Pageant, 13th edition (with accompanying teacher resources)
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Company
Date Published: 2006

Author: Mark Epstein
Title: Fast Track to a Five: Preparing for the AP United States History Examination
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Company
Date Published: 2006

Textbook Resources

Author: Thomas A. Bailey, et. al.
Title: The American Spirit: Volume 1: To 1877 (10th edition)
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Company
Date Published: 2002

Author: Thomas A. Bailey, et. al.
Title: The American Spirit: Volume 2: Since 1865 (10th edition)
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Company
Date Published: 2002

Author: Erik Brunn, et.al.
Title: Our Nation’s Archive: The History of the United States in Documents
Publisher: Black Dog & Leventhal Publishers, Inc.
Date Published: 1999

Author: Leonard Dinnerstein, et. al.
Title: American Vistas: 1877 to the Present (7th edition)
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Date Published: 1995

Author: Robert James Maddox
Title: American History Volume II: Reconstruction Through the Present (15th edition)
Publisher: Dushkin/McGraw-Hill
Date Published: 1999

DBQ Resources

Author: Alan Fraker, et. al.
Title: Doing the DBQ: Teaching and Learning with the Document-Based Question
Publisher: College Entrance Examination Board and Educational Testing Service
Date Published: 1995

Author: Kerry Gordonson
Title: DBQ Practice, Book 1: Ten AP-Style Document-Based Questions Designed to Help Students Prepare for the Advanced Placement U.S. History Examination
Publisher: Social Studies School Service
Date Published: 2003

Author: Kerry Gordonson
Title: DBQ Practice, Book 2: Ten AP-Style Document-Based Questions Designed to Help Students Prepare for the Advanced Placement U.S. History Examination
Publisher: Social Studies School Service
Date Published: 2004

Author: Michael Henry, Ph.D.
Title: U.S. History Skillbook: With Writing Instruction and Practice
Publisher: The Peoples Publishing Group, Inc.
Date Published: 2005

Author: Kenneth Hilton
Title: Document-Based Assessment Activities for U.S. History Classes
Publisher: J. Weston Walch
Date Published: 1999

Video Resources

Author: Multiple Editors
Title: United States History Origins to 2000, Volumes 1-26
Publisher: Schlessinger Media
Date Published: 2001
Volumes:
1) Three Worlds Meet (Origins-1620)
2) The Era of Colonization (1585-1763)
3) Slavery and Freedom
4) The American Revolution
5) A New Nation (1776-1815)
6) Expansionism
7) Democracy and Reform
8) Causes of the Civil War
9) Civil War
10) Reconstruction and Segregation (1865-1910)
11) Industrialization and Urbanization (1870-1910)
12) Immigration and Cultural Change
13) A Nation in Turmoil
14) The Progressive Movement
15) U.S. and the World (1865-1917)
16) The Great War
17) The Roaring Twenties
18) The Great Depression and The New Deal
19) World War II
20) Post War USA
21) The Cold War
22) Civil Rights
23) The Vietnam War
24) The Middle East
25) U.S. Politics (1960-1980)
26) U.S. Politics (1980-2000)

Teacher Resources/ Document Activities

Author: Kerry Gordonson
Title: Document-Based Activities: Using Primary Sources and the Internet
Publisher: Social Studies School Service
Titles & Copy write Dates:
1) World War II: The Home Front (2001)
2) The 1950’s (2004)
3) Cold War (2004)
4) The Civil Rights Movement (2001)
5) The Vietnam War (2001)

Author: MindSparks
Title: Debating the Documents: Interpreting Alternative Viewpoints in Four Primary Source Documents
Publisher: Highsmith, Inc.
Published Date: 2004
Titles:
1) The Lowell Experience
2) Jackson and the Indians
3) The War With Mexico
4) Uncle Tom’s Cabin
5) Was John Brown a Hero?
6) The Emancipation Proclamation
7) The Impeachment of Andrew Johnson
8) The Haymarket Square Riot
9) The Scopes Trial
10) The First “Red Scare”
11) America First: Isolationism and World War II
12) 1945: The Post-War Mood
13) Ideals & Violence: The Sixties Youth Rebellion
14) Reagan and the Fall of Communism: The Role of Ronald Reagan’s Presidency in the Final Collapse of Soviet Communism and the Soviet Empire

Author: Time (Multiple Editors)
Title: Moments In Time: DBQ Strategies and Practice in Document-Based Questions
Publisher: McGraw Hill/ Glencoe
Published Date: 2001
Units:
1) Unit 1/ 1777-1789: George Washington
2) Unit 2/ 1834-1859: Territorial Expansion
3) Unit 3/ 1850-1861: The Road To Civil War
4) Unit 4/ 1876-1901: Divisions Within
5) Unit 5/ 1890-1919: The Progressive Era
6) Unit 6/ 1914-1919: World War I
7) Unit 7/ 1917-1939: Exuberance And Despair
8) Unit 8/ 1939-1945: World War II
9) Unit 9/ 1947-1962: Cold War
10) Unit 10/ 1954-1963: The Civil Rights Era
11) Unit 11/ 1966-1978: Equality For Woman
12) Unit 12/ 1968-1970: The Vietnam War
13) Unit 13/ 1972-1974: The Watergate Crisis
14) Unit 14/ 1977-2003: The Information Age
15) Unit 15/ 1998-2001: The War On Terrorism

Author: Watson Institute for International Studies
Title: The Choices Program
Publisher: Brown University Press
Published Date: 2006
Titles:
1) Slavery in New England
2) Constitutional Convention
3) War of 1812
4) Spanish-American War
5) League of Nations
6) Isolationism
7) Hiroshima
8) Cold War Origins
9) Cuban Missile Crisis
10) Vietnam War
11) Fog of War

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