Annotated Works Consulted: Fine Arts Budget Cuts

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Annotated Works Consulted: Fine Arts Budget Cuts
"Arts Cuts at Colleges." New York Times 17 Aug. 2009: 1. MasterFILE Premier. EBSCO. Web. 17 May 2011. All schools are experiencing piercing budget cuts around the nation. Schools are being forced to “nip here, adjust there.” All though the article refers to the cuts as just a nip and adjust, a person would feel like the budget cuts of today’s economy is more like a slash here, burn there. Theses budget cost will force students and teachers to attend new reduced programs at their schools. The cuts themselves are believed to be a “symptom” of a much larger problem- having genuine higher education still exists in our colleges today. Higher education is becoming “streamlined to fit into the demands of the economy, either in terms of conducting basic research that can be exploited for financial gain or by producing competent employees and managers to fill what positions the economy can still provide.” Surprisingly, private school art programs are experiencing the worst of the budget cuts. The percentage of private schools dropping their fine arts program is nearly double the amount of private schools. This article focuses on thirty six connected Arts campuses in the United States that are struggling against keeping their fine arts program alive. It explains how one campus in particular is working tremendously hard to keep their academic programs, which is fine arts, alive at all costs. The campus is currently freezing all faculty staff member’s salary so that they will not have to result to laying-off any of their employees or start cutting any of their lesser taken classes or programs. With the hard and tremendous work that this art community’s campus is doing, with a little help of a microscopic amount of raised tuition of four percent, it is obvious that this school is going to make it through the harsh economy struggles that we are facing today. The school even worked
Taylor 2 to raise their financial aid

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