Annotated Bibliography Totc

Topics: A Tale of Two Cities, Charles Dickens, Novel Pages: 2 (751 words) Published: December 18, 2012
Annotated Bibliography: Portrayal of Women
In the novel A Tale of Two Cities written by Charles Darney, Madame Defarge and Lucie Manette resemble major characters as a result of the portrayal of women. Lucie is very caring, loving, and graceful, as Madame Defarge is evil and villainous. Although many will view Madame Defarge as the guilty, and Lucie as the innocent, after reading and researching the following articles, readers could admit that these characters may not be how they seem to be as first assumed. Mangum, Teresa . "Dickens and the Female Terrorist: The Long Shadow of Madame Defarge.." Litarary Refrence center. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Dec. 2012.

In the following article by Teresa Mangum, the author explains the evil role that Madame Defarge portrays in the novel A Tale Of Two Cities. Although portrayed as evil, Teresa Mangum explains that still Madame Defarde has been and still is a major factor in todays society. The Defarges marriage in the beginning of the novel exemplifies their strength in their need for each other. The first downfall in her character that is witnessed in this article is when Madame Defarge puts her trust from her marriage into question. Following this event, the author mentions Defarge as a kind of two-faced character, and the start of her character as a revolutionary leader. In todays society women are seen as tender and respectful individuals, but in the novel, Defarge is an example of the complete opposite, when her vicious ways come to show. In the article the author continuously examines Madame Defarge as a character who transforms the women role from motherly and innocent, to violent. As Madame Defarges character continues to ascend negatively, Teresa Mangum reiterates how Madame Defarge prefers revenge over her husband.

Madame Defarge is usually seen as the villain in past and recent history, although she’s portrayed as such a crude character, Madame Defarge still exists and has encouraged and inspired other...

Bibliography: Portrayal of Women
In the novel A Tale of Two Cities written by Charles Darney, Madame Defarge and Lucie Manette resemble major characters as a result of the portrayal of women. Lucie is very caring, loving, and graceful, as Madame Defarge is evil and villainous. Although many will view Madame Defarge as the guilty, and Lucie as the innocent, after reading and researching the following articles, readers could admit that these characters may not be how they seem to be as first assumed.
Mangum, Teresa . "Dickens and the Female Terrorist: The Long Shadow of Madame Defarge.."
Litarary Refrence center. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Dec. 2012.
In the following article by Teresa Mangum, the author explains the evil role that Madame Defarge portrays in the novel A Tale Of Two Cities. Although portrayed as evil, Teresa Mangum explains that still Madame Defarde has been and still is a major factor in todays society. The Defarges marriage in the beginning of the novel exemplifies their strength in their need for each other. The first downfall in her character that is witnessed in this article is when Madame Defarge puts her trust from her marriage into question. Following this event, the author mentions Defarge as a kind of two-faced character, and the start of her character as a revolutionary leader. In todays society women are seen as tender and respectful individuals, but in the novel, Defarge is an example of the complete opposite, when her vicious ways come to show. In the article the author continuously examines Madame Defarge as a character who transforms the women role from motherly and innocent, to violent. As Madame Defarges character continues to ascend negatively, Teresa Mangum reiterates how Madame Defarge prefers revenge over her husband.
Madame Defarge is usually seen as the villain in past and recent history, although she’s portrayed as such a crude character, Madame Defarge still exists and has encouraged and inspired other producers in theatrical plays. As said in the article women naturally “are known as nurtures and caretakers” (Mangum). Reading about Defarge’s character, it’s hard to sympathetically connect with because of the fact that Charles Dickens makes her such a villainous character. Throughout the novel, as explained in the article, Madame Defarge has faced many difficult things in her life, and has encountered things that could be argued to have shaped her character, as well as be an excuse for how she acts and seems. If Dickens were to emphasize these events and give more background on what could create an inner conflict within Madame Defarge’s character, the readers could feel sympathy rather than seeing her as the villain.
Hamilton, J.F. "Dicken 's 'A Tale of Two Cities. '." The Explicator 53.4 (1995): 204+. Literature
Resource Center. Web. 12 Dec. 2012.
In the article “Dicken’s “ A Tale of Two Cities ” by Hamilton, J.F the author explains the different paths Lucie and Madame Defarge take in their lives, but also explains how they are somewhat similar. Both characters in A Tale of Two Cities are involved with “Knitting” and “Weaving”. In the novel, the second book connects the golden thread to signify Lucie’s golden hair. Lucie has done many positive things such as helping her father recall to life after his imprisonment, encouraging Sydney carton to live a life without alcohol, and helping Mr. Lorry be apart of a loving family. In this article Lucie is said to be portrayed as the “light” of the book and always makes the best of the worst problems. While Madame Defarge is anxious for blood as foreshadowed with the wine, she is described as a vulgar woman who keeps track of who she thinks should die. Madame Defarge is resembled as the “evil mother as Lucie is the “good mother”.
In this following article Hamilton agrees that Lucie is a heroine character. Giving credit to Lucie she has definitely helped many people in many positive ways, but at the same time Lucie hadn’t lived out the same circumstances that Defarge has lived. These articles classify these two women as a positive or negative aspect to the novel A Tale of Two Cities, but they don’t give justice to the situation. Dickens has plenty of positive context towards Lucie’s character and how she has affected the novel, but no one talks about Defarge’s struggles and how it has affected her. If she wouldn’t have witnessed such horrific things in her life, Madame Defarge may have turned out different at heart.
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