Animal Farm Literary Analysis

Topics: Animal Farm, Rhetorical question, George Orwell Pages: 5 (2048 words) Published: September 9, 2013
George Orwell professes the animal’s faith and belief through having us as the reader believe that the animals are not smart enough to realize that the pigs drank the milk. Orwell is stereotyping the working class by saying that they are too dumb to know what is really going on. They just believe that the person in charge is doing the best for everyone and not just themselves. In Animal Farm, all of the animals trust Napoleon with the milk because they have been told to trust him so therefore they trust him. He shows the readers this because we as readers know where the animals are at all times as well as knowing where Napoleon is at all times. Where as the animals do not know where Napoleon is, but he knows where they are. This leads the reader to infer that Napoleon and the other pigs have taken the milk, but told the other animals that it was stolen.

During Squealer’s speech, he tries to hide the fact that they took the milk and apples for themselves and their own benefits, but not just for their self-centered behaviors. Through this speech, Orwell is using the most obvious tactic of Rhetorical Questions. In this case the rhetorical question is, “… Surely there is no one among you who wants to see Jones come back?” This question is brought up many times in the book because it is his way of saying that he is better than Jones and it shows his power of knowing that no animal will speak out and say that they want Jones back because they have been told that they should not want Jones back. They are told how to think; therefore, they do not realize that it is the same under both dictators. Another “trick” that is used to persuade the animals is the Appeal to Authority. This is shown when Squealer uses the rhetorical question to state that he has more power and has made the farm better than Jones ever did. Squealer states that was “proven by science” to make it look as if there is logic to the process and having him as leader. This is used as kind of a hint that Squealer is in control because he has conveyed to them that he is better than Jones and that he knows what is best for the animals. Lastly, this is an example of logos because he says that the pigs need it for their own health and “Milk and apples (this has been proved by Science, comrades) contain substances absolutely necessary to the well-being of a pig. We pigs are brainworkers. The whole management and organisation of this farm depend on us.” Squealer is saying that since they are in charge and they are pigs that they need the milk and apples because they are specifically used to help them. He is saying that if they did not take the milk and apples for themselves that the farm would not be under the same ruler ship and that it would be very different for the other animals.

On page 46 of Animal Farm the symbolism of Mollie’s ribbons and how they affected the views of the reader. When you think of Molly herself, you know that she symbolizes Bourgeoisie. Bourgeoisie is the class that is in contrast with the proletariat class. When you combine this with the ribbons, it is a symbol of the material things in life. The material things in life are those that pamper us. Some of these for them would have been the humans and how they groomed the animals and how they looked out for their best interests. Another thing that the ribbons represent are the humans, both good and bad. When Molly was told to dispose of the ribbons and not to place so much value in them, it showed how the animals were getting rid of the human race in their new society. This is not the way Molly thought it would be, therefore she left and went back to depending on the humans. She showed her dependence on others by not wanting to be free. She thought that it was better not to be free from the humans because she believed that they helped them thrive and be the best that they could. She did not see the need for independence.

The windmill was a monolithic in a sense. The basic idea of it...
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