Angela Davis Liberation Movement

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If I had the opportunity to travel back in time and witness a specific moment in our history, I would want to experience the Women’s Liberation Movement of the 1970’s. In previous generations, women were limited to only family life and were barred from many opportunities that allowed them to work outside of the house. The Women’s Liberation Movement wanted to break that mold and advance into a society where women could pursue the same goals and work alongside their male counterparts equally. As a feminist and adamant believer in gender equality for all, I would want to travel to this period in history to be able to meet Angela Davis and Gloria Steinem. These two women were huge advocates for Women’s Liberation and I would like to talk to them in order to truly get a sense of what it was like to be a part of the movement that redefined the concept of being a woman in the United States. …show more content…
Along with being an icon of the Black Panther Movement, Davis worked with the Women’s Liberation Movement through her writing. One of her most notable works, Women, Race, and Class, is a study that emphasized the concept of intersectionality in the movement. The book also called for African American women to join in the Women’s Liberation Movement and fight against misogynoir and internalized racism in the black community. Not only was Davis a poised leader that fought against misogyny, but she was one of the few women of color that translated the message of feminism through an African American perspective. I admire her for her passion and determination to end gender inequality despite backlash from her own community. She did not let criticism stop her from reaching her

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