Since the founding of the Constitution, the leaders of the U.S. had preserved the supremacy of the federal government over local governments. However, during the 1820s and 1830s, the tide turned with the introduction of Jacksonian Democracy. Followers of Andrew Jackson believed they were the moral guardians of the constitution and used it to protect states rights. They believed in having as little government as possible. Their policies were aimed at the "common man" and sought to bring individual liberties to them. One area that they did not tolerate though, was foreign immigrants and the Indians. Jackson did not believe in giving them equal opportunity as given to the Americans.

Also under Jacksonian Democracy came the new view of economics and society. The major dealing of Jackson was the defeat of the Second Bank of the United States. Jackson believed that since in the constitution, there was no justification to create such a bank, it was illegal. He also felt that having one large federal bank deprived state banks from a chance at survival. When the Bank's charter was up for renewal in 1832, Jackson naturally vetoed the recharter bill. He used his presidential veto quite freely. He states that the bank provides for the exclusive privilege of banking and concentration in the hands of few men. Eventually Jackson bled the bank dry of its funds and issued pet banks, similar to those proposed by the Jacksonian Democrats.

Jacksonian Democrats were challenged by the imminent nullification laws of South Carolina. Jackson immediately demanded that S. Carolina withdraw the bill and comply with the laws of the federal government. The Force Act was issued which allowed naval and armed troops to enter S. Carolina to enforce the laws.

One major area of dispute was the intolerance of foreigners by the Jacksonian Democrats. Jackson first had trouble with the Native Americans. He was undecided whether to expel the Indians or leave them alone on their reservations. It

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