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Andrew Jackson Common Man Essay

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Andrew Jackson Common Man Essay
The years 1824 - 1840 were the ages of the common man, mainly for white men, they are called this due to the expansion of political rights and democracy, however many people did not benefit from the expansion. To most, Andrew Jackson is perceived as the champion of the common man because of his advancements in the political power of middle class white men. He did this by reducing the voting restrictions for white men. Even though white males were getting more and more voting rights at this time, women, native americans, and the rich were left out and ignored by Jackson.

Many individuals benefited from the expansion of political rights and democracy, most being poor/middle class white men. “Change in number of people voting” chart shows
…show more content…
Some examples of people who did not benefit were women, native americans and african americans. At the time, women's rights were coming into the attention of the public eye, people were looking at it as a bigger issue than they did before, however, this did not help much. In a piece written by Harriet H. Robinson, Early mill girls are described as being children, overworked, and underpaid. This only contributed to the idea that Many individuals didn’t benefit from the expansion of political values and democracy. As well as women being ignored by Andrew Jackson, Native americans were ignored as well. Tecumseh wrote a letter to His fellow tribes asking for their help in fighting the settlers invading on their land. The letter talks about how before the settlers came, they were happy, and that now they are controlled and discriminated against, Tecumseh went as far as to say that his people were treated equally to blacks at the time. And African Americans, along with women and natives, were excluded from the “age of the common man”. In Angelina Grimke’s speech at Pennsylvania hall, she talks about how She felt it was her duty to stand and talk against slavery, and how she wanted to take it to the Legislature. It was through all of these that the age of the common man, became well, the

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