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Andrew Jackson and the Common Man

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Andrew Jackson and the Common Man
Andrew Jackson and the Common Man Andrew Jackson and his policies during his presidency strengthened American nationalism. He was a common man by birth although he shared traits between both the common man and elite. He was a self made man that had a lot of life experience rather than formal education. His struggles defined him. Jackson was a strong-willed man and first found success in the military. While President, he expanded his power and used it to get what he wanted. Jackson was a common man on the basis of the National Bank, his views of democracy and nationalism, and his use of the veto ax. Jackson’s entire life he had only known struggle. He struggled against poverty as a child, against the British and Spanish and Indians as a soldier, against the enemies of popular rule as an elected official. He was a clear popular vote winner in the 1824 but claimed that a corrupt bargain hindered his chance at obtaining the office. He got the office in 1828 and made it clear his intentions to get what he wanted and benefit the common man. More struggles for Jackson ensued the day he took office. For one, Jackson strongly disliked the National Bank. He believed it hurt the common man and wanted to help them in the economy. One of his biggest actions however was the veto of the Second Bank of the United States. Jackson was way ahead of his time seeing the value of honest labor and the excesses of federal power. Jackson's devotion to democracy was unsurprising in one born of the people and bred in the school of hard experience. Jackson's appeal to the American people was the appeal of the chieftain to the tribe. He was a common man, and stood up for the common people. His actions were to push for a government that acted within the limits of the Constitution. Jackson's faith in himself motivated him to work and achieve throughout his life. His faith in himself and his common man motivated nationalism because democracy was a "work in progress". Jackson's struggle

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