Ancient India Quick Writes

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1. How did the geographical location of the Indus Valley make possible the growth of civilization there?
The growth of civilization in the Indus Valley was made possible by the many geographical features surrounding the area where settlement in India first began. For example, the Indus River, which flows across the northern region of the subcontinent, would flood when the heavy snows of the Himalayas melted. As a result, a layer of fertile soil was left behind along the banks of the river, creating ideal farmland on which early settlers thrived. In addition, the Hindu Kush, the westernmost extension of the Himalayan Range, limited India’s contact with neighboring lands, such as China. In response to this separation, civilization in the Indus valley was allowed to develop without the cultural or physical interference of other lands.
2. What evidence of early Indus valley civilization is found in modern India? Some evidence of early Indus civilization found in modern India includes the ruins of two great cities, Harappa and Mohenjo Daro. Both cities were curiously similar, despite the fact that their remains lay more than 300 miles apart. The most historically striking feature of these two civilizations was the way in which they were both well planned. For example, each stood near towering fortresses and had a repeated street and building pattern. In addition, the homes of these early villages were equipped with the most advanced comforts of their time, such as indoor plumbing. By studying these remains, archeologists have discovered the many features and complexities of early Indus Civilization.
3. What did the Vedas reveal about Aryan society and religion? The Vedas and the Vedic texts revealed that the Aryan religion was polytheistic and involved rituals in which priests sacrificed animals, food, or drinks. The writings also revealed that, in Aryan society, some rituals were reserved only for select people and that the Aryans valued religious

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