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Ancient History Assess the Contribution and Impact of at Least Two Queens During This Period.

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Ancient History Assess the Contribution and Impact of at Least Two Queens During This Period.
Queens played great roles during the period of New kingdom Egypt. They were known as the Great Royal Wife's of the pharaohs and contributed politically, religiously and diplomatically influencing the roles of women during this period, and even future queens.
Queen Tiye was an important influence on new kingdom Egypt and was the key wife of Amenhotep III and they ruled a peaceful reign. Tiye was the daughter of Yuya which was a officer in the chariotry, priest of min and Tuya (chief of harem of Amun and min) which both had Nubian royal blood origins. Married at a young age, one year after he became pharaoh and gave her the title Great royal wife. Also gave birth to arkhenaten and other children. She greatly shaped foreign relations, religion and politics at the time. She also was greatly altered depictions of the queen in art.
She was well educated, competent and complementary rather than dependant on her spouse Amenhotep III impacting the role of women during the period. Historian Robins highlights that the “king could renew himself through female principle... important ritual roles” proving the queen was of key importance to the pharaoh.
Tiye was Represented as the same size as her husband Amenhotep III and was considered to be a traditional queen. She was a leading figure in solar theology however more untraditional inclined changes came with iconography during her time as Great Royal Wife becoming increasingly equal to that of her husband. This proposed the idea that the role of the queen was becoming progressively more important, therefore the depiction of her in equal proportions to her husband suggests that the roles were becoming split between the pharaoh and the queen. Unlike other queens she was also frequently present in his monuments.
She was besides her husband amenhotep III colossal statue in the Medinet Habu temple located in Western Thebes and was also the same size representing her equality. The cobra depicted them as powerful gods. She was

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