Analysis Of The Hillbilly Stereotypes

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The population of the show portrayed its success in the relational effect to the majority of the American in the contemporary society. The middle white class also accept this "Hillbilly" stereotype because they view it as something that's exclusive to that "kind" of person. Dean even says that the more successful Americans believe that "these fools haven't crawled out of the muck because they don't want to", as if poverty was their choice. The "hillbilly" stereotype also includes the borrowing of African American culture that often turns into racial mimicry. For example Hank Williams, a key figure in the development of country music, learned to play his guitar from a black street performer. The stereotype was accepted among the middle white

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