Analysis Of The Handmaid's Tale

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How did she come up with the plot for The Handmaid’s Tale?
Atwood has always enjoyed writing Sci fi novels. The feminist and environmental views stemmed great from Atwood’s own personal advocacy of such things (Atwood, Interview by Rosenburg).

What inspired her to write about womens’ rights and feminism?
“The beginning of the feminist movement in the 1960s changed her attitude toward a self-destructive mindset that she later labeled a "post-Romantic collective delusion” (“The Handmaid’s Tale”).

Where did she get the influence to write Handmaid’s Tale?
She had a thought about birth rates plummeting
(“Margaret Atwood: Haunted”).

“Speaking to Battiata, Atwood noted that ‘The Handmaid’s Tale does not depend upon hypothetical scenarios, omens,
…show more content…
Harvard later appeared in The Handmaid’s Tale (“Biography - Margaret Atwood”).
She was born in 1939 in Ottawa. When she was young she lived in Canada where her family would enjoy much of their time in the wilderness. Being in the wilderness is what helped to motivate her and inspire her to write (“Margaret Atwood Biography”).
Margaret not only writes novels but also expresses her feelings and views through poems. Most of her poems reflect a lot of dismay and loss, which is connected to the death of her father and “the realization of her mortality” ("Margaret Atwood," Poetry Foundation).

What is her personal idea of the Gilead society in the book?
Atwood believes that her vision is not far from reality. Speaking to Battiata, Atwood noted that “The Handmaid’s Tale does not depend upon hypothetical scenarios, omens, or straws in the wind, but upon documented occurrences and public pronouncements; all matters of record” (Margaret Atwood, Poetry Foundation).

How does Atwood keep readers’ attention on the whole book so well? What makes this book so successful?
It is because her razor-sharp mind, her sense of humour and her ability to cut straight through to the truth and to reveal it in story, this book can be so interesting

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