Analysis of the Handmaid's Tale

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In the text, the Handmaid's Tale, author Margaret Atwood uses unique feminist writing to satire 1980s female rights issues with a religious state that oppressed females. Examples of the mirrored realms in the instance of exaggeration of inactivity in pursuit of female rights, a nuanced comparison of between the patriarchal America of the 80's and the government that ran Gilead. Atwood depicts subtle parallelisms between the time in which she lived in, and the misogynistic world seen in the country of Gilead. This assertion sets out to prove two point: 1.) The Handmaid's Tale has a literary value in that it portraits a society with misogyny through use of word choice, quotes, and dialogue implications which can be reached by the reader 2.) Atwood is directly relating the ideas of misogyny found in the novel to the lack of feminist role in society in the 1980's.

To accurately prove this claim the first source we must go to is this text. With word choice in the text we begin to form the picture of society in which women are seen as inherently evil, this is seen in the Biblical passage used as a ceremonial way to defend the androcentrism, or the mindset that men are the example of ideal citizens.
In using textual evidence we also see that women are objectified, where the men of Gilead treat the woman like heads of cattle, having them branded and being taught the ways of docile submission. This in all essence is misogyny as the men don't even identify that women are equal to men not just in social standard but in manners of civil rights more importantly. Also it is to be noted yet again women are see as inherently evil so they must be taught their place as a role of the servant to the man. The generalization made here also shows the society of Gilead stereotypes women as weak individuals both morally and physical as support both by implicit conclusions reach from quotes and specific dialogue from male characters to female characters.

Now that the first part of

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