Analysis of Shakespeare's Sonnet 116

Topics: Marriage, Love, Consciousness / Pages: 2 (296 words) / Published: Oct 6th, 2013
Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 116” In his “Sonnet 116,” Shakespeare uses allusion to develop the theme of enduring love. In his creative style, Shakespeare references instances in today’s world even though he wrote it more than three and half centuries ago. The allusion focuses predominantly on marriages and love, frequently using diction such as “impediments” and “alters” that suggests marriage is more so in the mind than the actual body. The allusions are revealed through Shakespeare’s use of words about marriage. First, Shakespeare describes how “the marriage of true minds” cannot be denied to them if they truly love one another (1). The phrase “true minds” informs the reader that the couple is getting married solely because they love each other; not because they have underlying reasons and are told to do so. The allusion suggests that marriage is within the mind because it is everlasting. The “mind” carries connotation of living as its’ own being, and not a part of the human body. After he goes on about what love is and how strong it is for the people it involves, he talks about how it lasts no matter what. Shakespeare wrote “but bears it out to the edge of doom,” explaining that love endures all events (12). Line 12 says that whatever hardships love goes through that it will last until death. This is because “bear it out” refers to love not changing or altering as time goes by; not even when faced with death or poverty. Because, if it is true love, people can do anything they set their minds to in life. True love is always there when support is needed and cares for the other mate. As a result, Shakespeare’s use of creative allusion helps develop his theme of love endures all when true.

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