Analysis Of Serving In Florida By Barbara Ehrenreich

Good Essays
In the three essays that we were assigned to read have connections. In “Serving in Florida” by Barbara Ehrenreich, she decided to work in low paying jobs that pay minimum wage. An example of this is when it states “the multinational mélange of cooks; the dishwashers, who are all Czechs here” (364). This example relates to Diana Kendall when it states, “The working class and the working poor do not fare much better than the poor and homeless in media representations” (428). These quotes express how the working class can be. An example from Gregory Mantsios that corresponds with these when it states “From cradle to grave, class position has a significant [...] economic success” (391).
In these essays, class is widely expressed as not fair. Frankly,

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    We live in a world where materialism has never been so advertised. The past hundred of years have shown the evolution of the American dream. It has gone from simply living a stress free and sustainable life to having the aspirations of buying a house, making good money, and the opportunity of upward social mobility. American society preaches that everybody has equal opportunity to achieve the American dream. Although this claim is widespread among the American society and even the government, it is unfortunately false. The idea that everybody has equal individual opportunity is a myth because social classes and social inequalities restrict individuals from pursuing the American dream. Barbara Ehrenreich, in her text “Serving in Florida,” highlights the inequalities and…

    • 1135 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Conlin, Michelle, and Aaron Bernstein. "The Working Poor Are Not Getting By in America." Poverty. Ed. Viqi Wagner. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2007. Opposing Viewpoints. Rpt. from "Working ... And Poor." Business Week (31 May 2004). Opposing Viewpoints In Context. Web. 13 Mar. 2013.…

    • 1077 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    In the article, "Class in America", Gregory Mantsios (Myths and Realities 2000) shows us how what class a person is in affects his or hers life more than they think. This article is written sufficiently well however, it does have some weak spots. I will prove my thesis by examining his use of examples and showing factual data and statistics, but also show how this article could have been better.…

    • 2061 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Working Class

    • 424 Words
    • 2 Pages

    I’m not going to lie, while reading The Dispossessed I found myself very confused. This is partially due to the fact that I do not know anything about politics. William Deresiewicz studied the working class and the stigmas it holds. In The Dispossessed he illustrates his observations and talks about how the working class is viewed by society today. Deresiewicz highlights on some observations that I would have never noticed. The first is that T.V. shows today are not revolved around working class families. Personally, I think that since 80% of the U.S. workforce is considered working class, people do not want to watch a show about what they are experiencing in their everyday lives. They want to see the extravagant lifestyle that they could have had if they were given the resources and opportunities. The working class hasn’t been taught to believe that they’re entitled to do the best of everything, and they will take what life brings to them. Deresiewicz mentions that, “working class people care more about their families and their friends and the places they’re from than they do about their careers.” I agree with Deresiewicz and believe that most working class people worry more about the things that are going on around them such as friends and the place they’re from rather than worrying about making the right steps in order to get to the middle class and have a good career.…

    • 424 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    “No one ever said that you could work hard—harder even than you ever thought possible—and still find yourself sinking even deeper into poverty and debt.” This is a quote by Barbara Ehrenreich who wrote “Nickel and Dimed,” she is a journalist with a PHD in biology and writes about her own story as she chooses to change her entire lifestyle, face the hardships of being a part of the working poor class just to see if she can survive. Throughout the book she illustrated the different jobs she endured and the struggles that came along with the jobs. Her story highlights the social inequality she experienced based on her status, working poor class, routine lifestyle, her experience living on the edge and the stagnant pay she received. There was a lot of social inequality in her journey that many Americans seem to overlook on the poor working class.…

    • 3042 Words
    • 13 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Nickel and Dimed

    • 2899 Words
    • 12 Pages

    A riveting tale about the world of low class workers, Ehrenreich puts into words what most are don’t acknowledge or are afraid to acknowledge. Through first-hand experience, Ehrenreich successfully navigates her way through the low wage work by working such common low wage jobs as waitressing, housecleaning, and sales. While along the way discovering that each job encompasses their own organizational structure, culture, and identity that she is focused to discover and conform with while being paid no more than $7.00 an hour and even at some points as little as $2.43 (plus tips). Ehrenreich persuasively forces us to realize that the American dream is slowly slipping away. No longer is America the land of opportunity where hard work pays off, instead millions are suffering in route to servicing to their rich counterparts.…

    • 2899 Words
    • 12 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Castle

    • 891 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Main Ideas/ Themes; Justice, Class division, Inequality, Family, Marginalisation of working class by large corporate groups, Value of memories and place as opposed to monetary value, Man’s struggle for equality and justice, Exploitation of disempowered groups (working class) by the empowered group, A satirical view of suburban working class life – home is where the heart is, ,Importance of family and community, unity, comment on the fabric of…

    • 891 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In the essay “Serving in Florida,” Barbara Ehrenreich records managers being the “class enemy” and how low level jobs are inadequate in terms of pay. She states that most managers and assistant managers were prior underdog employees of the restaurant business and they are only there to make the big bucks for corporations. Ehrenreich bemoans how managers are the “class enemy”; for instance, they never allow servers to take a one second break but the manager’s just sit down all the time and don’t do their actual job. She also states the fact servers will have to attend mandatory meetings, and the managers threaten the servers to have their rights be taken away including lockers, breaks, and the managers rifling through their belongings without personal consent. Not only is management a problem, but the low-income is far from a comfortable living situation. The author seeks her own survey among her fellow co-workers about where they live, some in cars because they cannot afford to live in a hotel/home, and are living in nearby hotels because the gas to drive to their job is just too expensive. She defends “It strikes me, in my middle-class solipsism, that there is gross improvidence in some of these arrangements,” and she points out that she is shocked for the fact no body plans for their future. Ehrenreich finds a second job at Jerry’s to take on so she doesn’t find herself not having a place to live, nor gas to drive, or food to eat. Ehrenreich gives examples of how to deal with exhaustions management and tells herself “Ideally, at some point you enter what serves call a “rhythm” and psychologists term a “flow state,” where signals pass from the sense organs directly to the muscles, bypassing the cerebral cortex, and a Zen-like emptiness sets in.”, while being undercover as a server in a minimum wage…

    • 319 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Living from Minimum Wage

    • 738 Words
    • 3 Pages

    We know in the world of today, most households have two incomes to maintain the basic everyday needs. We all have worked jobs that paid bare minimum, gave crappy hours along with fatigue. Gilbert and Henslin divided the lower class into the Working Poor and the Underclass (Gilbert The American Class Structure 1998). The Working Poor’s employment is in the service and manual labor and the Underclass relies solely on government aid and has not participate in the workforce.…

    • 738 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    For each, she had to master new skills, learn the social environment of each job, and work laboriously for hours on end. She further analyzes and evaluates the rising problem of poverty. A single, educated woman – with the ability to rely on conveniences such as emergency cash, a car, and a credit card; a woman who was without children or a family to support – struggled to make ends meet working one or more jobs demonstrates the inadequacy of the minimum wage and its fail to sufficiently supply an individual or family with the means necessary to support the “working poor.” Companies are reluctant to raise the pay of their employees and can punish and/or fire employees who step out of line. “When you enter the low-wage workplace, you check your civil liberties at the door…We can hardly pride ourselves on being the world’s preeminent democracy if large numbers of citizens spend half of their waking hours in what amounts to a dictatorship.” (Ehrenreich 210) The calculated $30,000 “living wage” for a family of three comes to $14 an hour, and 60 percent of Americans earns less than that. The lifestyles of the poor are tainted with low self-esteem and the need to “work through” fatigue, injury, illness, etc. “They are [the lifestyles] emergency situations. And that is how we should see the poverty of so many millions of low-wage Americans – as a state of emergency.” (Ehrenreich…

    • 691 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    James W. Loewen, essay “The Land of Opportunity,” discusses how many times Americans don’t know about social classes and the effects they have on society. Loewen argues that the common American people aren’t given equal opportunity in this day in age. He says that American history books have great influenced what we see about the class system because a great deal of history is often left out.…

    • 990 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In the essay “Seeing and Making Culture: Representing the Poor”, hooks proposes a different perspective on issues regarding people of higher class compared to those of lower class. In doing so, she clarifies and illustrates assumptions made about the poor, how they are viewed in popular culture, and in the media. To further validate her points, she utilizes ideas that stem from her own personal experiences with poverty, as well as examples from pop culture, and mass media to demonstrate how these representations portray the lower class in ways that radiate negative stereotypes.…

    • 386 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    A Wall of Fire Rising

    • 444 Words
    • 2 Pages

    In Edwidge Danticat’s “A Wall of Rising Fire,” majority of the towns’ people were viewed as low class. Working full-time always having to provide for the family with wage below poverty line. “Lili, was squatting in the middle of their one-room home, spreading cornmeal mush on banana leaves for their supper” (Danticat 72). For instance, in the 1800s through the 1900s industrialization and immigration brought poverty new kind and on a new scale to Eastern European immigrants. Danticat meets the same circumstances as Harrison Bergeron, being placed in a government control and determining to be free under a communist government “Near the sugar mill was a large television screen in a iron grill cage that the government installed so the shantytown dwellers could watch the state sponsored news at eight o’clock” (Danticat 76). This gives the reader the visual of how poverty was and showing the facts and outcomes if being “poor” or low class. “A Wall of Rising Fire” the level of socialism and class for Lili and Little Guy is not what it could be.…

    • 444 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Serving in Florida

    • 946 Words
    • 4 Pages

    I could drift along like this, in some dreamy proletarian idyll, except for two things. One is management. If I have kept this subject on the margins thus far it is because I still flinch to think that I spent all those weeks under the surveillance of men (and later women) whose job it was to monitor my behavior for signs of sloth, theft, drug abuse, or worse. Not that managers and especially "assistant managers" in low-wage settings like this are exactly the class enemy. In the restaurant business, they are mostly former cooks or servers, still capable of pinch-hitting in the kitchen or on the floor, just as in hotels they are likely to be former clerks, and paid a salary of only about $400 a week. But everyone knows they have crossed over to the other side, which is, crudely put, corporate as opposed to human. Cooks want to prepare tasty meals; servers want to serve them graciously; but managers are there for only one reason - to make sure that money is made for some theoretical entity that exists far away in Chicago or New York, if a corporation can be said to have a physical existence at all. Reflecting on her career, Gail tells me ruefully that she had sworn, years ago, never to work for a corporation again. "They don 't cut you no slack. You give and you give, and they take."…

    • 946 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Ra of Serving in Florida

    • 1052 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Serving in Florida is an essay written by Barbara Ehrenreich that is a first-hand experience by the author in the world of working minimum wage jobs. The author tried to balance two low paying jobs in order to make ends meet. Ehrenreich mainly uses pathos, or the emotional appeal, in her essay to persuade young adults to go to college and strive for high paying jobs and uses ethos, the ethical appeal as the secondary rhetorical appeal in her essay to convince her readers that she is indeed a credible author.…

    • 1052 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays