Analysis of Plight of the Little Emperors

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Plight of the Little Emperors “Plight of the Little Emperors” was a very interesting book about youth in China and there expectations. Chinese parents push there kids as hard as they can to make sure they succeed in life. Some of these kids are pushed to know where and left in the cold. In this article, it explains one of the biggest social problems in China today. The three main topics in “Plight of the Little Emperors” are parent pressure in kids’ academics, college graduates and the lack of jobs, and how to escape the harsh world. The first main topic about this book is the academic pressure parents put on there kids. Parents will do anything to get there children to be successful in school. Giving up her day job, one mother would go with his son to school every day, making sure he would stay on task. Some parents will enter there children in weekly resume boosting activities even if they can not afford it. To the kids the world revolves around the college entrance exam. This exam is a very large version of the SAT. If students do well on this test then top schools will accept them. Another reason why parents put all this pressure on there kids is, because their kids will support there old age. Since there is only one child per family in china, these kids would need middle class jobs to support their mother and father when they grow old. Once the child grows up and is receives a good job both he and his parents will be rewarded.

The second main topic about this book is how many college graduates and the lack of jobs to fill. After the child grows up and gets in a good college, the hard work and pressure does not stop. In China, college students have very few friends because of how hard they work in class. They want to be the best student with the best grades, so there is no time for socializing. One big problem today in China is today he amount the amount of middle class jobs there are. Colleges let out four million graduates yearly,

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