Analysis of Marketing Strategy of Coca Cola and Pepsico

Topics: Coca-Cola, Pepsi, PepsiCo Pages: 42 (12425 words) Published: July 17, 2010
ANALYSIS OF MARKETING STRATEGY OF COCA COLA AND PEPSICO

PROJECT REPORT ON “ANALYSIS OF MARKETING STRATEGY OF COCA COLA AND PEPSICO”

UNDER GUIDANCE OF: MR. ASHISH SAIHJPAL (FACULTY, MARKETING)

SUBMITTED BY: AKHILESH MITTAL ARVIND JAIN BIPIN SINGH KARAMJEET SINGH PAWAN KUMAR (MBA II SEMESTER, 2008-2010)

UNIVERSITY BUSINESS SCHOOL, LUDHIANA

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ANALYSIS OF MARKETING STRATEGY OF COCA COLA AND PEPSICO

CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION TO BEVERAGE INDUSTRY

1.1 BEVERAGE
Any type of liquid specifically prepared for human consumption. Beverages in addition to basic need form part of the culture of human society. Different types of beverages are as follow 1.1.1 WATER Despite the fact that most beverages, including juice, soft drinks, and carbonated drinks, have some form of water in them; water itself is often not classified as a beverage, and the word beverage has been recurrently defined as not referring to water but the bottled water that is processed through proper filtration and purification comes under the beverage category. 1.1.2 ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES An alcoholic beverage is a drink containing ethanol, commonly known as alcohol, although in chemistry the definition of an alcohol includes many other compounds. Ethanol (alcohol) is a psychoactive drug that has a depressant effect. Alcoholic beverages are divided into three general classes: Beers: The two main types of beer are ale and lager; each type has a distinct production processes. Mass-produced beer is typically aged for only a week or two after its fermentation and has an alcohol content of 4%–6% ABV. Other kinds of beer may be fermented and aged for several months. Wines: Wine involves a longer (complete) fermentation process and a long aging process (months or years) that results in an alcohol content of 9%–16% ABV. Sparkling wine can be made by adding a small amount of sugar before bottling, which causes a secondary fermentation to occur in the bottle.

UNIVERSITY BUSINESS SCHOOL, LUDHIANA

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ANALYSIS OF MARKETING STRATEGY OF COCA COLA AND PEPSICO

Spirits: Unsweetened, distilled, alcoholic beverages that have an alcohol content of at least 20% ABV are called spirits. Spirits are produced by distillation of a fermented product; this process concentrates the alcohol and eliminates some of the congeners. 1.1.2 NON-ALCOHOL BEVERAGES A non-alcoholic beverage is a beverage that contains no alcohol. Non-alcoholic mixed drinks (including punches, "virgin cocktails", or "mock tails") are often consumed by children; people whom wishing to enjoy flavorful drinks without alcohol. Non-alcoholic beverages contain no more than .5 percent alcohol by volume. It also includes drinksthat have undergone an alcohol removal process such as non-alcoholic beers and de-alcoholized wines. Non-alcoholic variants: Low Alcohol Beer Non-Alcoholic Wines Sparkling Ciders 1.1.3 SOFT DRINKS A soft drink is a beverage that does not contain alcohol. The name "soft drink" specifies a lack of alcohol by way of contrast to the term "hard drink". The term "drink", while nominally neutral, sometimes carries connotations of alcoholic content.Beverages like colas, flavored water, sparkling water, iced tea, lemonade, squash, and fruit punch are among the most common types of soft drinks. Many carbonated soft drinks are optionally available in versions sweetened with sugars or with non-caloric sweeteners. 1.1.4 HOT BEVERAGES Coffee-based beverages: Cappuccino, Coffee Espresso, Café au lait, Frappe, Flavored coffees (mocha etc) Hot chocolate: It is a heated beverage that typically consists of shaved chocolate or cocoa powder, heated milk or water, and sugar.

UNIVERSITY BUSINESS SCHOOL, LUDHIANA

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ANALYSIS OF MARKETING STRATEGY OF COCA COLA AND PEPSICO

Hot cider: It is an alcoholic beverage usually made from the fermented juice of apples, although pears are also used. In the United Kingdom, pear cider, which has no apple content, is known as Perry. Tea-based beverages: Tea,...

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12. Olli-Pekka Kallasuuo, Gary Jackson, Franz Humer, Arthur Gensler, Sergey Petrov, Alan Klapmeier, Alexander B. Cummings and Duleep Aluwihare,” MOMENT OF TRUTH – GLOBAL EXECUTIVE TALK ABOUT THE CHANLLENGES THAT SHAPED THEM AS LEADERS,” HARVARD BUSINESS REVIEW ON THE TEST OF A LEADER, P.101-103 13. Nicolas Checa, John Maguire and Jonathan Barney, “ THE NEW WORLD DISORDER,” HARVARD BUSINESS REVIEW ON LEADERSHIP IN A CHANGED WORLD, P.64-65 14. Max H. Bazerman and Dolly Chugh, “ DECISION WITHOUT BLINDER,” HARVARD BUSINESS REVIEW ON MAKING SMARTER DECISION, P.90 15. Constantines C. Markides, “ TO DIVERSIFY OR NOT TO DIVERSIFY,” HARVARD BUSINESS REVIEW ON STRATEGIES FOR GROWTH, P.85 16. David J. Collis and Cynthia A. Montgomery, “ CREATING CORPORATE ADVANTAGE,” HARVARD BUSINESS REVIEW, P.29 17. C.K.Prahalad and Kenneth Lieberthal, “ THE END OF CORPORATE IMPERIALISM,” HARVARD BUSINESS REVIEW ON CORPORATE STRATEGY, P.103
18. http://www.slideshare.net/rajsinghprofessional/cocacola-in-rural-india 19. http://www.sirpepsi.com/pepsi11.htm 20. http://www.agriculture-industry-india.com/agricultural-commodities/soft-drinks.html 21. http://www.indiabschools.com/marketing_018.htm 22. http://inventors.about.com/library/inventors/blpepsi.htm
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