Analysis Of Little Red-Cap By Grimm Brothers

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For many generations, the fairy tales, loved by many, have been passed down from relatives and friends, being shared and retold by one individual to the next. Growing and evolving as the years go by, these stories live on through readers’ lives. The deep connection between the timeless tales and the lives of people accentuates its need to exist in society. These fairy tales mold and shape people’s own stories and are a reflection of what individuals experience and encounter. During times when one feels lost and disoriented, fairy tales are a tool of navigation; they unveil a path and guide one down it. Not only do these tales provide insight to oneself, they impart an educational source to children and individuals in society. They spark and …show more content…
Individuals paint the tale in their own, unique fashion, showing the power of imagination. Every tale has a lesson to take away. The moral value that fairy tales hold are essential to apprehend and grasp. By understanding the hidden messages embedded within a story, one can apply them to his or her own life and experiences. Little Red-Cap by the Grimm Brothers is one of the many fairy tales that exist today. Through its history, elements, and value, one can see the components that truly make the story exceptional. One must first delve into the history of Little Red-Cap in order to understand the sense of wonderment the tale emanates. The fairy tale is written by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, two German brothers renowned for their collection of folktales. This compilation of tales and creation of Little Red-Cap are a way to recall the “basic values of the Germanic people through storytelling” (Zipes). The story of a little girl going to visit her grandmother signifies the morals of people of German culture. By using the form of a fairy tale, the Grimms can convey to readers the moral principles that …show more content…
The fairy tale molds one’s perception of society as the “most precious values of [one’s] culture--family, good and evil, courage, gratitude, the beauty of nature, respect for others, the need to plan, and more--become embedded in the character” of an individual (Nidds 11). These values help one to grow as a person and to be appreciative of the world around them. It allows individuals to apply the lessons they have learned in their daily lives and transforms them into people with a better understanding of the world. The impact of the tale on a growing child is tremendous. By reading Little Red-Cap, parents “increase [their] child’s chances of success in school, furnish the social and cognitive tools necessary to deal with others, and inculcate a sense of his or her worth” (Nidds 11). The fairy tale demonstrates to a child how problems are handled and how one can use this knowledge to solve issues of his or her own. It boosts children’s self-esteem and their attitude towards themselves. Reading this tale allows children to step out into the world, prepared for anything to come. As an individual grows and enters adulthood, he or she can carry with them the lessons learnt and knowledge gained. Not only does this tale aid children, it also helps those stepping into adulthood. The values presented in the fairy tale can provide guidance to struggling adults and individuals of

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