Analysis Of Hillbilly Elegy

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Fueled by the inward desires of all people, politics have become increasingly polarized as each election season passes, taking the nation’s citizens under its tight grasp. Many feel as if their voices are not heard by “the establishment,” and resort to the voices of political outsiders to convince them that hope still exists. The memoir Hillbilly Elegy explores this anti-establishment attitude and the group of people who passionately fuel this movement. Sociologically, the perspectives of hillbillies are analyzed by one of their own, Mr. J.D. Vance. He defines the white underclass as those who promote the movement through their distrust of a government that imposes excessive regulations, ultimately causing their economic plight. Coal mining

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