Analysis Of Aristotle's Beliefs On How To Live A Good Life

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Though Aristotle does not explicitly speak of meaning, he surely considered the reality of impartial values and meaning. While his primary concern was on the happiness gained by accounting for these values, he does not say that the happy life means the meaningful. However, we can infer that he thought that the good life and the meaningful life are equals. Therefore, Aristotle’s plan in order to live a good life is understandable, and is a guide to a meaningful life.
Aristotle’s beliefs on living a good life start with careful deliberation of the ends and the means. Suppose I want a laptop--the laptop is my goal, purpose, or end. I can do various things to get the laptop--such as earn, steal, borrow, or save. These things are known as my means. The means I decide to use depends on which is more convenient and which leads to the most benefits. Contemplating about the end goal that we are pursuing, and the means we use to reach that goal is practical thinking. However, this type of thinking does not come to fruition, until purposeful action occurs; which is acting with some purpose, goal, or end in mind. This purposeful action is compared differently with thoughtless action, which is an action with no purpose
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This includes practicing good habits. Aristotle defines these good habits as virtues. There are intellectual virtues which pertain to the mind, and moral virtues based on the regular inclination to choose rightly. Aristotle values moral virtue specifically, because it plays an important part in living a good life. This is because if we make bad choices, it will not only cause us inconvenience, but the inability to live well. These choices of ours determine our ability to live well, and the development of good habits allows us to freely make decisions that can improve our

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