An Introduction to Early Judaism

Good Essays
Summary
In “An Introduction to Early Judaism”, James C. VanderKam looks into the time in history between the Hebrew Old Testament and the Evangelical New Testament (586 BC – 70 AD) – the Inter-testamental period or the Second Temple period .
VanderKam begins by sketching the history of the period, beginning from the return of the Israelite from the Babylonian exile to the destruction of the Second Temple. VanderKam describe the history of this period in a precise and simple manner, especially in highlighting the political struggles of the time periods – taking the readers on a journey through time briefly visiting each era during the Second Temple period: the Persian period, the Hellenistic age, and the Roman period. VanderKam did an excellent job in carefully limiting the scope of history to the land of Israel and the surround regions significant during the particular time period.
However, the highlight of “An Introduction to Early Judaism” is the treatment of the literature of the Second Temple period. VanderKam reveal his knowledge of this field with the treatment of this section of his book. The literature of this period that was covered includes the Apocrypha, the Pseudepigrapha, Apocalypses, Wisdom Literature, Poetic works, the work of Philo and Josephus, and other great archaeological discoveries (the Elephantine Papyri, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and the Masada). In the end, VanderKam gave an extensive background, analysis and commentary to each of the literary productions and archaeological discoveries.
To wrap up his survey of the Second Temple period, VanderKam looked into the leaders, groups and institutions of this time period and how it effect the events that occurred. He probed into the social structure of the Second Temple period by analyzing the people of influence and the institutions that shaped the culture during those times. This includes priests, civil rulers, the Sanhedrin, Pharisees, Sadducees, Essenes, the temple, the

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Powerful Essays

    Introduction to Judaism

    • 5062 Words
    • 21 Pages

    through generations and blood ties it is usually symbolized by an external marker, act of membership in the community ethnic religions are often thought to be located in a particular region and based on that region (e.g. Hinduism, and Judaism) predominantly Judaism has been passed through blood ties, generations its perfectly possible to be Jewish even if we are not religious, theistic our affiliation with the group marks us as Jewish, even if we abandoned the larger belief structure of the tradition…

    • 5062 Words
    • 21 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Stephanie Allen The Early Christians and Judaism When Christianity was created, there were two different perspectives of what was deemed correct. The early Christians believed Jesus Christ was the chosen one, and comparatively, those who followed Judaism believed the chosen one had yet to arrive. The earliest Christians inherited many of their central doctrines from Judaism, including monotheism and the belief in a covenant between God and humanity. The most important difference that Christianity…

    • 1053 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    A Comparison of Early Christianity and Judaism The religions Christianity and Judaism have a great deal in common. Early Christianity was influenced by Judaism as it was created by Jews. As a result of early Christianity being practiced by mostly Jews, there were more similarities between early Christianity and Judaism than there is between modern Christianity and Judaism. However, there were also differences between the two. These differences and similarities are essential in examining the relationship…

    • 819 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    INTRODUCTION Early Marriage is common all over the globe and has inflicted dangerous and devastating effects on young children who are compelled to tie the knot in most cases. In many parts of the world, one and top of the main cause of Early Marriage is a gratification for overcoming the family’s financial and social needs. Most Early Marriages are considered to be forced which is true but children entering into an Early Marriage out of choice should also be warned of various personal and health…

    • 698 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Chantel Hunt MNE 347 Palestinian Studies Bashir Bashir ISLAMS EARLY INTERACTIONS WITH JUDAISM AND CHRISTIANITY Because of its harsh desert environment, the Arabian Peninsula was left relatively unmolested by the several competing empires that swept through the Fertile Crescent just north of it in the early centuries before Islam. At the beginning of the 7th Century, the Byzantine and Sassanid empires were embroiled in a 26-year war for supremacy, which had a lasting cultural impact on the…

    • 1061 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Judaism

    • 4701 Words
    • 19 Pages

    Judaism Everything we do, believe or see cannot be defined and complied just in one sentence. If this was possible, than it would have been really easy for everyone to understand and master the universe. All we would have to do would be to just look it up in the dictionary and define it. There would be no conflicts or arguments over the same word. This would also make Experience and history less important to today’s world, but things do not work like that. Even a simple word like Religion…

    • 4701 Words
    • 19 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Judaism

    • 427 Words
    • 2 Pages

    faiths, including Christianity and Islam, Judaism is the original. There were around 13.1 million Jewish people in the world in 2007 with the most residing in the USA and Israel, according to the Jewish People Policy Planning Institute. Judaism orginated in the Middle East over 3500 years ago and was founded by Moses. Most Jews, however, trace their history back to Abraham. The Torah is considered the central and most important religious document in Judaism even though the religion has a rich history…

    • 427 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Judaism

    • 4961 Words
    • 20 Pages

    |REFERENCES | | |(Who are they?) |(What do they believe in?) |(What is the “TAO” for them?) | | |1. Judaism and Christianity | | | | | |2. Socrates and The Sophists |…

    • 4961 Words
    • 20 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Judaism

    • 448 Words
    • 2 Pages

    For Thousands of years of intense persecution Judaism has survived. How is Judaism defined and what does it mean? How does one Become a Jew, or, what makes one a Jew? How has this group of Individuals survived through all these years? These questions may not Although have finite answers, what follows are my opinions. Judaism is a monotheistic religion, Which Believes In a single creator, Which created everything in the world, and That everything has a purpose and a meaning. It is a religion developed…

    • 448 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    Judaism

    • 1084 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Judaism Darlene Branconier REL/134 July 31st, 2012 David Gainey Judaism Judaism is among the oldest of the world's major living religious cultures of the Jewish. Rich in culture and history Judaism is the first of three (including Christianity and Islam) monotheistic religions; teaching in the belief in one God. There is a cultural and religious spirit that contributes to the characterization of the Jewish people and the Jewish lifestyle. Influenced by Jewish history, the Jewish festival…

    • 1084 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays