An Enlightened Path

Satisfactory Essays
Jacob Morton

Mrs. Easton

English 1301-018

12 March 2013

An Enlightened Path

How would the average person react if the electricity suddenly went off, and remained off? Would they hunt down a flashlight or light up the candles? Many people would simply stay in the dark waiting for the power to come back on. My desire to find solutions to problems would not allow me to sit still for long. A recent job loss forced me to choose between snatching the first available job I could take, and forging a unique solution to the dilemma myself. After much discussion with my wife and some focused research, I chose to go back to school and pursue a career in electronics engineering. The work environment, the type of work performed, and the skillset required by an electronics engineer are the reasons behind my decision to sacrifice a steady paycheck in order to gain the knowledge that will secure my future success.

The thought of wearing a suit and tie every day and confining myself inside a stuffy, dusty office for forty plus hours a week will never be my idea of a dream job. While I am not afraid of hard labor, I do not fantasize about self-employment as a highly paid, self-employed construction contractor or landscaper. I prefer work that balances the physical with the cerebral. Mobility and variety in my day is also an important factor. My ideal work environment allows me the freedom to make decisions without overbearing supervision, allowing me to determine tasks, priorities, and goals to meet deadlines efficiently (United). At the end of the day, I want to look at the fruits of my labor, see genuine progress, and have a fulfilling sense of accomplishment.

The type of work I performed in the past never afforded me the opportunity to explore my true potential. The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics summarizes the job of an electronics engineer as,



Cited: United States. Bureau of Labor Statistics. “Summary Report for: 17-2072.00—Electronics Engineers, Except Computer.” O*Net Online. National Center for O*Net Development, 2011. Web. 28 Feb. 2013.

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