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American Marriage in Transition Summary

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American Marriage in Transition Summary
American Marriage in Transition Summary The American Marriage in Transition exert explores the views of American couples and the differences in the three types of marriage over the last several decades. “Deinstitutionalization of marriage” is the phrase used by Andrew J. Cherlin to describe American couples in marriage. The examples explored are different types of cohabitation and same sex marriage. Cherlin refers to other historical works that point to shifts in marriage decades before. Those shifts have noteworthy implications for the future of marriage. Cherlin describes the fiscal and edifying forces that have changed family life. More and more women have gotten jobs over the decades, because that’s what the job market has called for. The norm of marriage before childbearing has been changed by effective contraception and abortion. Although reaction in favor of marriage seems to be stronger in the United States than in other countries. Births outside of marriage today have a higher percentage at one out of three. (p.424). The adults are more likely to get married, but they are more likely to divorce also. Children are more likely to grow up in separated homes as well. Marriage is increasingly becoming an option for all Americans. These days’ people are freely able to chose whether to have children in wedlock, or in a cohabiting relationship, or on their own. The swift transitioning patterns into and out of marriage and the high rate of single parenthood creates no stability for families. Something has to be done about the situations these children are put in. Unfortunately the unstable marriages make it hard to pass any kind of policy for the families. The government has to find a way to support these families whether it be single parent, same sex marriage, or just poor families. The children are our future and most of the time these circumstances effect the kids of

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