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American Immigrants In The 19th Century

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American Immigrants In The 19th Century
The American Dream is the idea that every U.S citizen has equal opportunities to be successful. In the late 19th century and early 20th century immigrants traveled to america just to have the “American Dream”. Immigrants faced gruesome conditions coming to the U.S. and were treated in positive and negative ways. Even though the immigrants were escaping religious, racial, and political prosecution, the price they payed to get to America was gruesome. Most of the immigrants traveled overseas on a large boat or ship. They lived below deck which was dark, damp, and dirty. The lower deck was full of bugs and animals like lice, ticks, cockroaches, and rats. It was also crawling with diseases like measles, diphtheria, scarlet fever, typhoid, smallpox,

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