American Foreign Policies in the Late 1800s

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The interactions between countries were coined as diplomacy and the sets of principles that dictated one country's interaction with others were coined as foreign policies. The U.S. obeyed the isolationist policy set by Washington during his administrative office until after the civil war with the growing need for new markets to sell their industrial products. The foreign policy developed by this need would eventually prove to be bad for the world as it solely wanted to expand American power for land and market.
First of all, American foreign policies in the late 1800s were dominated by the same characteristic as all other European powers, imperialism. Although the traditional isolationist policy from President Washington remained, America became more involved in Asian as well as world affairs. The reasoning behind the interests was, however, malicious. For example, Social Darwinism was a popular theory among the American population by the late 19th century. It was the belief that a country must expand in territory and grow in power to survive, the theory of evolution applied onto human societies. (History Today Ltd., 45) This belief allowed the government to wage wars and annex other countries while retaining public support, despite the lack of a valid reason. Another example of America's malicious intents could be found in the poem, White Man's Burden by Rudyard Kipling. This poem described the racial superiority of the Caucasian population and went on to place responsibility on the Caucasian population for educating all other inferior races. This poem represented the general sense of superiority felt by average white Americans and convinced them for expansion. (History Today Ltd., 45) Overall, the reasoning behind American foreign policies were malicious and only for their self interest.
Next, The American government interfered ruthlessly with Latin American affairs under the Monroe Doctrine. The Monroe Doctrine was a government document drafted by John Quincy

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