American Flamingo

Good Essays
The Blue Eyed American Flamingo Who ever thought there could be so much emotion and so many qualities in a flamingo? After reading this poem author Pape expresses his feelings and the beauty in a flamingo by using analogies describing the features and the distinct details to such a simple bird. The first sentence in this poem is one of the most important. The first sentence says “I know he shot them to know them.” (line 1) This may seem like a very simple statement, but Greg Pape makes it very bold and is able to express himself off this sentence, by saying he now knows and understands why Audubon had the passion he did for flamingos. In Greg Pape’s poem “American Flamingo” he captures John James Audubon’s passionate view of the American flamingo. John James Audubon was an American ornithologist, outstanding artist and author of “Birds of America” (560). In the long history of writing, poetry has held a very special meaning for a human and to allow them to express all of their emotions. The poem “American Flamingo” combines the mysterious symbols of nature with the inexact emotional language. “American Flamingo” takes looking at the painting to another level. It was difficult to portray the many emotions Pape was trying to depict throughout the poem. He comes off to be exceptionally stress-free and at ease with life and what he has experienced. “However; his metaphoric character allows readers of all ages to be able to find a connection with his poetry” (Fitzpatrick). Awesomely, Pape ties several of nature’s incredible elements into his poetry and writing such as; interactions between amazing creatures and their rare or beautiful habitats. On the other hand, He recognizes the high regard he holds for using language in physical representation of objects, animals, people, and places from memories rather than offering abstractions attached to emotion. Pape was a man of very few words he powerfully described life’s minor events and unforgettable memories with


Cited: Byrne, Edward. "American Flamingo." Souther Illinois Universty Press, 21 Mar 2007. Web. Web. 13 Sep. 2012. <http://edwardbyrne.blogspot.com/search?q=American Flamingo>. Fitzpatrick, Kelly. Good reads. N.p., 13 Mar 2011. Web. Web. 16 Sep. 2012. <http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/148430531>. Pape, Greg “American Flamingo” Literature for Composition. Eds, Sylvan Barnet, William Burto, and William E. Cain 9th ed. Boston: Longman, 2011. 560-61. Print.

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