American Colonies Dbq

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"In the 1600's there existed a degree of religious freedom in some colonies, while others were characterized by strict intolerance."

then go on to further explain and elaborate on the thesis. As the textbook reveals, the colonists in New England were made up of a web of families who were extremely devoted to their faith (Christianity). This is where the university of Harvard originated which was originally meant to train ministers and over half of the graduating students became congressional divines.

we can also depict the lives of the puritan women in New England. some historians depict the colonial period as a "golden age" for women. "Surviving letters indicate that men and women generally accommodated themselves to the gender roles
…show more content…
they were not a system of interrelated families but instead a mix of poor to middling farmers along with a large portion (70-85%) indentured servants. this depicts a group of peoples who did not necessarily come for religious reasons but for materialistic gain, such as money, a get-rich-quick scheme. these people were more susceptible to tolerating religious diversity seeing as they did not seek it. Ironically it was the colonies founded by people denied religious freedom in England which seemed to be less tolerant when they got to America.

and to sum it all up you should use a well stated conclusion something along the lines of:

In theory, many colonies tried to grant religious freedom, but in practice full religious freedom was never attained;however, religious freedom in the colonies was more accepted in America than in England.

Of course this is just a brief explanation compared to the real essay. i suggest you fill in the blanks with some support from wherever your source is. but for now i have to go write my own because its due tomorrow and its already very late. so good luck on the essay and hope this generally answered your

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