Alzheimer's Disease and Social Welfare Programs

Topics: Alzheimer's disease, Alois Alzheimer, Brain Pages: 4 (1376 words) Published: August 22, 2013
Professor Brenda Anderson
Developmental Psychology
26 November 2012
Alzheimer’s – A Growing Risk
In today’s world the aging society has a new problem to face. In addition to retirement, heart disease, stroke, arthritis, and many other issues, Alzheimer’s disease is becoming the biggest issue when entering late adulthood. Alzheimer’s, unlike other diseases and illnesses, has no cure and there aren’t many measures that are proven to prevent it. The issue of Alzheimer’s demands more attention and awareness because the majority of people will soon be entering the late adulthood stage of their life where they will most likely fall victim to Alzheimer’s disease.

The history of Alzheimer’s disease begins with a German psychiatrist named Alois Alzheimer. He was the first to describe it in 1906 and named the disease after himself. Alois discovered the disease in a fifty year old woman. After her death, Alois publicized on the disease and named it after himself. There were similar cases that were reported in medical literature during that time period as well (Alzheimer’s).

Alzheimer’s disease is defined by the National Library of Medicine as a type of dementia that eventually worsens over the course of time. It is a loss of brain function that negatively impacts a person’s short term and long term memory, their behavior, and the way they think. The victims of Alzheimer’s disease are people that are fifty years and older, although people younger than fifty may get it as well. There is also proven scientific evidence of a genetic predisposition for Alzheimer’s disease; if an individual’s parent had Alzheimer’s, they will most likely get it too. Statistics show that females are at a higher risk for getting Alzheimer’s and people with high blood pressure are also at a greater risk (Board).

Despite knowing the risks, scientists are still unable to narrow down what exactly causes people to develop Alzheimer’s disease. Doctors believe in two prominent theories for what...

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