all-inclusive hotels

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The All-Inclusive Hotel

The all-inclusive concept is a new trend to the hospitality industry and has grown rapidly in the sun and sand destinations, which is why the growth of all-inclusive hotels in these areas is massive. These hotels aim to take the full advantage of customers who are looking for a full package holiday. According to Brown (2009) ‘There are no surprises as the utility offered through restaurant options tantamount to good value for money. The results also showed that both entertainment package and cultural exposure offered to visitors of all-inclusive hotels are indicative of good value for money’.
At first, the all-inclusive theory is introduced to the hospitality industry when a holiday camp was opened in Britain back in 1930s. However, this is not a really all-inclusive as it is described right now. In the past, clients still had to pay for the beverage in some forms of currency (Issa and Jayawardena 2003). Nevertheless, the cashless all-inclusive concept was introduced when there was an inclusive vacation club was opened in 1950, the French company popularly known as “Club Med” started to expand the holiday camps around the globe. This club’s opening has become a pioneer of the all-inclusive development and the all-inclusive demand rate has been growing especially in the Islands. Specifically Issa and Jayawardena (2003) ‘The Club Med type of vacation was successful during the early post-war years in setting different standards in comfort and providing new, continuous entertainment for all ages at reasonable prices’.
The all-inclusive trends have become popular in many places such as Antigua, St. Lucia, Jamaica, and Cyprus. This is supported by the proof that the number of visitors arriving to Caribbean has risen by 5.4 percent in 2012 (Major 2013). Sandal Royal Caribbean Resort can be seen as a typical example of being successful in all-inclusive industry. The price for one night staying in this resort is included airport transfer

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