Alder Quotes And Analysis

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‘The true definition of mental illness is when the majority of your time is spent in the past or future, but rarely living in the realism of NOW.’
- Shannon L. Alder

The quote listed above by Shannon Alder is very meaningful and thought provoking, relating to not just people who suffer from personality disorders, but to anyone that may occasionally be conflicted with stress, anxiety, or any other forms of suffering. Prioritizing the focal point, Alder acknowledges how the ‘true definition’ of a mental illness is over-contemplating our past or future when, in reality, is not in our control. To truly admonish or greatly diminish a person’s symptoms, he or she must live by this golden rule to live in the moment. Today’s generation

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