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Albert Camus The King: Film Analysis

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Albert Camus The King: Film Analysis
In Albert Camus' book chapter "The Rebel," Camus defines rebellion is when a rebel experiences a feeling of having his or her rights being broken, they decide that enough is enough and stand up for herself/himself. In the scholarly article "Teaching about Civil Disobedience," written by J. Clark, Thomas Vontz, and Kristoffer Barikmo, they define civil disobedience as a nonviolent act to break an unjust law, to bring attention to some perceived injustice. The theories and definitions in these texts will be applied to the characters actions and intentions in Jonathan Kaplan film Over the Edge, as well as the actions and intentions of the Stonewall Riots and Montgomery Bus Boycott. From this analysis, in Kaplan's film rebellion and civil disobedience …show more content…
In the article "The Montgomery Bus Boycott and the Fall of the Montgomery City Lines," written by Felicia McGhee, McGhee writes the life of the racial segregation of the bus system and the effect of the boycott. On December 1, 1955, forty-two years old Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat to a white man after a long day of work. When the bus driver asked her and three other blacks to move to the back, Parks refused giving an explanation to why she said, "My feet were not tired but I was tired-tired of unfair treatment." (McGhee 254). Her actions violated the bus segregation laws and she was subsequently arrested for disorderly conduct. In the year before Rosa Park's arrest, two teenagers, Claudette Colvin and Mary Louise Smith were also arrested for similar actions (McGhee 253). Blacks were outraged by the arrest of yet another black women on a city bus. Provoked by Park's arrest, the Montgomery's black residents initiated a 381-day boycott of the bus system. The boycott was disastrous for the Montgomery City Lines, costing the company $750,000. The residents were "boycotting a system of oppression, segregation, prescribed by the State of Alabama and the Montgomery City Council" (McGhee 252). The boycott ended on December 20, 1956 only ended after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the city’s segregated bus system was unconstitutional (McGhee 252). This ties to Camus standards of the moment of rebellion is when the rebel "finds his voice" and feels that enough is enough, the rebel will stand up for himself/herself (14). The Montgomery black residents were tired of the unfair treatment of the bus segregation laws that they decided to stand up for themselves, they organized a boycott and in the end, they were able to succeed and end the bus segregation laws. But the Montgomery Bus Boycott also meets Clark et al

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