Against Bilingual Education

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Mary Ann Carrillo What is bilingual education? Bilingual education is a term that describes the different kind of educational program such as English as a Second Language. This program is taught in their native language. “For example, young children might be taught to read in their native language of Spanish; they are transitioned to English-only instruction when their English is proficient enough to ensure success.” (http://www.suite101.com/content/bilingual-education-programs-pros-and-cons-a227708) Since 1960, there was a controversy in the public school to have bilingual education. The bilingual education programs have promise students a good education in their native language, so they won’t fall behind in their schoolwork. This program is to provide to teach English as a second language until the students are ready to be in all English class setting. Some people think that having bilingual program will not work but others think that it will work. However, I believe that having bilingual education is not a good thing. Many students are developing their need for their native language; this keeps them from learning and getting use to the English language. Many teachers are having their lesson in their native language but it slows them or taking long for them to learn and be able to understand English. “Some critics argue that bilingual education slows the learning process of English and the assimilation into out American Society.” (http://www.ericdigests.org/1997-3/bilingual.html) Bilingual education is unsuccessful attempt at integration into society. It was necessary since it was suppose to help the children who are immigrants and as well as the minorities coming together into society. Bilingual education is required to separate the teachers and the classroom. They believe that slowly things will come and bring the kids together; allowing the children to get their education in their language about three or more years. “They further proposed

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