African literature

Topics: Africa, Atlantic slave trade, Sub-Saharan Africa Pages: 5 (1738 words) Published: July 25, 2015
African literature
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
African literature refers to literature of and from Africa. While the European perception of literature generally refers to written letters, the African concept includes oral literature(or "orature", in the term coined by Ugandan scholar Pio Zirimu).[1] As George Joseph notes in his chapter on African literature in Understanding Contemporary Africa, whereas European views of literature often stressed a separation of art and content, African awareness is inclusive: "Literature" can also imply an artistic use of words for the sake of art alone. ...traditionally, Africans do not radically separate art from teaching. Rather than write or sing for beauty in itself, African writers, taking their cue from oral literature, use beauty to help communicate important truths and information to society. Indeed, an object is considered beautiful because of the truths it reveals and the communities it helps to build. [2] Contents

  [hide] 
1 Oral literature
2 Precolonial literature
3 Colonial African literature
4 Postcolonial African literature
5 Noma Award
6 Major novels from African writers
7 Notable African poets
8 Secondary literature
9 See also
10 References
11 External links
Oral literature[edit]
Oral literature (or orature) may be in prose or verse. The prose is often mythological or historical and can include tales of the trickster character. Storytellers in Africa sometimes use call-and-response techniques to tell their stories. Poetry, often sung, includes: narrative epic, occupational verse, ritual verse, praise poems to rulers and other prominent people. Praise singers, bards sometimes known as "griots", tell their stories with music.[3] Also recited, often sung, are love songs, work songs, children's songs, along withepigrams, proverbs and riddles. A revised edition of Ruth Finnegan's classic Oral Literature in Africa was released by the Cambridge-based Open Book Publishers in September 2012. [4] Precolonial literature[edit]

Examples of pre-colonial African literature are numerous. Oral literature of west Africa includes the "Epic of Sundiata" composed in medieval Mali, and the older "Epic of Dinga" from the old Ghana Empire. In Ethiopia, there is a substantial literature written in Ge'ez going back at least to the 4th century AD; the best-known work in this tradition is the Kebra Negast, or "Book of Kings." One popular form of traditional African folktale is the "trickster" story, where a small animal uses its wits to survive encounters with larger creatures. Examples of animal tricksters include Anansi, a spider in the folklore of the Ashanti people of Ghana; Ijàpá, a tortoise in Yoruba folklore of Nigeria; and Sungura, a hare found in central and East African folklore.[5] Other works in written form are abundant, namely in north Africa, the Sahel regions of west Africa and on the Swahili coast. From Timbuktualone, there are an estimated 300,000 or more manuscripts tucked away in various libraries and private collections,[6] mostly written in Arabic but some in the native languages (namely Fula and Songhai).[7] Many were written at the famous University of Timbuktu. The material covers a wide array of topics, including Astronomy, Poetry, Law, History, Faith, Politics, and Philosophy among other subjects.[8] Swahili literature similarly, draws inspiration from Islamic teachings but developed under indigenous circumstances. One of the most renowned and earliest pieces of Swahili literature being Utendi wa Tambuka or "The Story of Tambuka". In Islamic times, North Africans such as ibn Khaldun attained great distinction within Arabic literature. Medieval north Africa boasted universities such as those of Fes and Cairo, with copious amounts of literature to supplement them. Colonial African literature[edit]

The African works best known in the West from the period of colonization and the slave trade are primarily slave narratives, such as Olaudah...


References: Colonial African literature[edit]
The African works best known in the West from the period of colonization and the slave trade are primarily slave narratives, such as Olaudah Equiano 's The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano (1789).
Continue Reading

Please join StudyMode to read the full document

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • English Language and African native language Essay
  • Literature Essay
  • Essay on African Literature From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  • Caribbean Literature Essay
  • African American
  • An African American Fight for Respect Essay
  • Literature in English Essay
  • Literature Essay

Become a StudyMode Member

Sign Up - It's Free