African American Community: Art And The Harlem Renaissance

Satisfactory Essays
Historically the appreciation of art has been inconsistent within the African American communities. Social biases have been depicted about the art community, leaving other communities afraid of exposing themselves to the many opportunities that art has to offer. According to the 2008 census of Arts, the U.S. populations were a total of 224.8 million people and of that the African American race made up 25.6 million of that population. Of those in the African American population, only 12 million people were associated with the arts. Long before this census was created the Harlem Renaissance was one of the first and many examples of art portraying a positive impact on the black community. Other positive influences in the black communities included

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    The Harlem Renaissance was a cultural, artistic, and social period of creation and new modes of thought. Jazz, a new type of music swept the streets of New York City in the 1920’s. Every jazz artist has taken the style and made it their own over the years and added onto the legacy of what jazz is. Today, jazz is not only still its own popular entity, but nearly all modern music can trace some part of itself back to jazz.…

    • 771 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Harlem Renaissance was African-American’s cultural movement that began in 1920, it was blossoming of African American culture in terms of literature and art starting in the 1920 to 1930 reflecting the growth of Black Nationalism and racial identity. Some universal themes symbolized throughout the Harlem Renaissance were the unique experience of thralldom slavery and egressing African-American folk customs on black individuality. African American population of United States highly contributed in this movement; they played a great role to support it. In fact, major contribution was made by black-owned businesses and publication of their literary works. Nevertheless, it relied on the patronization of whites.…

    • 630 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    “A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and culture is like a tree without roots” - Marcus Garvey. The Harlem Renaissance was a period of time in which racial pride and culture were thrust away in favor of a more traditional style of art. However, during this time, racial pride was best expressed through folk art via the means of relatable structure, understandable word choice and everyday subject matter. Common poets of the time chose not to imitate the formal and restrictive style of the European influenced “high art” and instead believed in a more down-to-earth, conversational style of writing. In these choices, poets began to shape a new form of art called “folk art” that gave readers content inspired by daily life and no longer barred by the restraint of European art.…

    • 568 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    From the 1920s through the mid 1930s, the Harlem Renaissance, a literary, artistic movement, helped change African American culture for the better. The Harlem Renaissance was a very important part of history and here are three reasons why. First, how the Harlem Renaissance started and when. Next, people from the Harlem Renaissance. Finally, what happened due to the Harlem Renaissance.…

    • 284 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Renaissance is defined as a movement or period of vigorous artistic and intellectual activity. The Harlem Renaissance was significant because it was like the rebirth of the African American culture. We could finally prove our worth, our intelligence, and show off our talents.…

    • 700 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    My final topic that I chose is The Harlem Renaissance. The Harlem Renaissance was the name given to the cultural, social, and artistic explosion that took place in Harlem. In a phase of the Great Migration, half a million African Americans or so moved to the cities of the North. Most of them moved from the rural South in hopes of escaping poverty and oppression of Jim Crow Laws. White Landlords refused to rent to African-Americans, this led many newcomers to cluster in all-black neighborhoods. In the 1920's Harlem became the center of African-American Culture.…

    • 95 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Harlem Renaissance was a period in history where the arts in the African American community flourished. The Harlem Renaissance took place after the end of World War I and expanded into the middle of the 1930s. The Harlem Renaissance brought out African American writers, poets, artists, composers, singers, and dancers. These arts were influenced by artistic development and racial pride. The Harlem Renaissance was a time where the arts became popular and many forms of literature and music were created. Jazz and the blues were popular music stylings in the Harlem Renaissance. Theater also became popular. The first musical written, produced, and performed by African Americans, Shuffle Along, was also created and made it’s Broadway debut in…

    • 200 Words
    • 1 Page
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    on farming to earn their payment. They would also worked in unsatisfactory areas and worked as peasants for the whites. Due to the poor conditions in the South, many fled to the North in the rural Areas. This was called the Great Migration, a movement that led to the Harlem Renaissance. They sought new opportunities as well as dealing with the failure in the society. (myblackhistory). As a result of this, Africans Americans and the whites were competing for the jobs. Racism was still in effect as blacks were paid less than minimum wage. The Communist party was concerned about the black rights, compared to the Republican and Democratic parties who gave little thought to them. Not only did they give black position of power, but they…

    • 127 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Harlem Renaissance was a literary, artistic, and intellectual movement that kindled a new black cultural identity, spanning the 1920s and to the mid-1930s. While reading the article “Black Renaissance: A Brief History of the Concept” I learned that the Harlem Renaissance was once a debatable topic. Ernest J. Mitchell wrote the article, explaining how the term “Harlem Renaissance” did not originate in the era that it claims to describe. The movement “Harlem Renaissance” did not appear in print before 1940 and it only gained widespread appeal in the 1960s. During the four preceding decades, writers had mostly referred to it as “Negro Renaissance.”…

    • 105 Words
    • 1 Page
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Young men are holding their drinks around a dirty mahogany floor. Some men stand around bopping their head to the upbeat music whereas others their drunkenness of the night be show with their boughs of laughter. They are not there at her at his club for the liveliness or alcohol. They are there for one thing only. They are there for the sway of the mesmerizing female dancer who has everyone in the room transfixed on her. Though they were transfixed in her presence they find no problem shouting obscene words that would demean a young girl. The lack of respect doesn’t bother the sensual dancer because it happens so many night before. She just goes on and does the job she was supposed to do. During, the Harlem Renaissance African American female…

    • 219 Words
    • 1 Page
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Painter Aaron Douglas, the "father" of African Art, stated in 1925, "Let 's bare our arms and plunge them deep through laughter, through pain, through sorrow, through hope, through disappointment, into the very depths of the souls of our people and drag forth material crude, rough, neglected. Then let 's sing it, dance it, write it, paint it" ("Harlem Renaissance" 1, par. 4). These words of triumph and strife epitomize the state of living during the Harlem Renaissance in the United States. Liberation, cultural pride, and expression in the arts embodied this period in American history. Beginning at the end of World War I and continuing on until the brink of the Great Depression of the 1930 's, feelings of both acceptance and segregation contrived discord between blacks and whites living among one another. Effecting black Americans as well as America in general, this movement had a profound impact on our country that to this day is apparent in everyday life.…

    • 856 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    African Americans in the South during the early 1900's had to face segregation from whites. As a result, more than six million African-Americans migrated from southern farms to northern and western cities between 1915 and 1970. This historical event was known as the Great Migration. Consequently, the Harlem Renaissance took place. Due to the large amount of people moving to the North, black communities became common in big cities. Harlem was the black cultural center of New York City. The Harlem Renaissance was a cultural movement of the 1920's in Harlem, New York. During this time period, African Americans exercised a newfound freedom of expression, which led to extensive achievements in art, music, and literature.…

    • 115 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Undoubtedly, the notion of blackness influenced the development of the Harlem Renaissance. African Americans wanted to find a new value of their skin color in order to brake with old stereotypes. As E. Patrick Johnson states, during the time of Harlem Renaissance, blackness was perceived as a sort of a weapon to fight with the white dominance. During the time of slavery, African Americans were excluded from political and cultural life and, that is why, they decided to actively stand up against this subordination and exclusion (Johnson, 2003).…

    • 297 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    SURREALISM AND HARLEM RENNAISANCE Comparing and Contrasting the Two Art Periods “Surrealism and Harlem Renaissance”…

    • 982 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    While the Harlem Renaissance was a getaway for African Americans, the black church was there to escape. The oldest recorded black church in North America was in 1788, in Savannah, Georgia. They were first called "The First Colored Church" was a place to gather to strategize against racial segregation and oppression, especially in the time of the Harlem Renaissance.…

    • 59 Words
    • 1 Page
    Good Essays