Adversity In Brave New World

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Adversity forces us as humans to reevaluate ourselves and also pushes us to limits that we would never have found. In the novel To Kill a Mockingbird, the protagonist Scout endures hardships and through the experiences, discovers what she stands for and who she is. Similarly, Mahatma Gandhi discovers his role in society and his morals through the adversities in South America. Lastly, in the book Brave New World, the hardships of the protagonist Bernard Marx causes him to identify himself based on who he actually is as opposed to what was assigned to him. In the novel To Kill a Mockingbird, Scout Finch, a young girl, faces adversity throughout the story. As a result of her father’s defending the accused black man Tom Robinson, much of the town turns on the Finch family including the children Scout and Jem. At school, Scout encounters other schoolchildren who jeer and bait Scout. However, because of her father asking her to resist the temptation to throw punches at the bullies, she walks away with her head held high and acts as the bigger person. Through this incident, Scout found that she is able to control her impulses and check her emotions. Furthermore, she developed her …show more content…
In the society of the World State, everybody’s identity had been developed for them in a highly mechanized and controlled way. A person’s identity is largely influenced by their peers and their caste. Bernard is an Alpha Plus, one the of the highest castes there is. However, as result of his physical abnormalities, he is isolated and rejected by the rest of his caste. This isolation and ensuing hardships force him to reevaluate and doubt the World State and the identity given to him. He develops bitter feelings against the World State and thus creates for himself and identity which was not assigned to

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