Adolf Merridew and Piggy Churchill

Topics: World War II, Adolf Hitler, Nazi Germany Pages: 6 (2149 words) Published: April 21, 2014
Adolf Merridew and Piggy Churchill

When anyone thinks of the word “disorder” they are likely to think about a war, or some problem that is faced in society today. As shown in Lord of the Flies by William Golding, sometimes the disorder of the world lies within ourselves. In this allegorical novel, William Golding utilized precise details such as physical attributes and personality to represent Hitler and Winston Churchill before, and during World War II through his characters Jack and Piggy. They were not only represented for what they did in the war, but how they were in their early lives as well.

As a boy, Adolf was a good student up until high school which upset his father. He did not work, and spent most of his days reading books and drawing pictures. Hitler wanted to be an art student, but he failed the entrance exam of the Academy of Fine Arts twice. He sometimes sold his drawings and paintings to consider himself an artist. Hitler desired to be in the army, but when the Austrian Army called him in for a physical examination, he was found unfit for service. “(Jack was) tall, thin, and bony… his hair was red beneath the black cap. His face was… freckled, and ugly without silliness” (Golding 18). He later went on to serve in the German army as a messenger on the western front. Hitler’s obsession with the army became so intense he even organized a private army called Storm Troopers. Their uniforms were brown with swastika emblems to give a sense of unity and power. In similarity to Hitler’s army, Jacks tribe wore their face paintings to feel as one. Not only was Hitler involved in the army, but he concerned himself with political observations. He looked up to the Social Democratic Worker’s Party in Vienna. He thought no form of government could last if it treated separate nationalities differently. When Hitler was imprisoned, he wrote Mein Kampf (My Struggle in German) in which he stated his beliefs - one being that Germans represented a superior form of humanity. Hitler was a skillful politician and organizer. He became leader of the Nazis and quickly built party membership due to his ability to stir crowds with speeches. Not only was Hitler looking for people to join him, but Jack as well. In chapter nine, Jack asks who is going to join his tribe. “I gave you food,” Said Jack, “and my hunters will protect you from the beast…” (Golding 150). For both leaders, memberships were quickly gained.

After WWI, Germany was forced to sign the Treaty of Versailles. It held Germany responsible for the war and made the country lose much of its territory. The defeat in WWI shocked the Germans, Hitler included. He thought the unity of the German nation was threatened and he wanted to save Germany. Many people did not take Hitler seriously. His brilliant blue eyes and his words seemed to hypnotize who listened to him. His audiences replied to his speeches in awe. His strategies brought his audiences to a state of frenzy. Similarly, in chapter nine after the assembly for Jack’s tribe members, they all began to dance and chant as if they were in a state of frenzy. In addition to Adolf’s speeches, he set out to find people who could help him rise to power. He won friends in small towns, labor unions, farms, and businesses. He focused on smaller groups of people for support. In 1919, he attended meetings of a small group called the German Worker’s Party. He joined it and later changed its name to the National Socialist German Worker’s Party - later to be known as the Nazi Party. He then assembled the main people who would help him to power such as Joseph Gobbell, Hermann Goring, and Rudolf Hess - for Jack, it was Maurice and Roger. With the people they needed, they were now ready to continue with their plans.

From the start, Jack seems to be an ominous figure. He always seemed to have a certain power over the boys. This is similar to how Winston Churchill viewed Hitler in the beginning. Hitler’s behavior and attitude unsettled...
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