Adkins Vs. FadKins Case Study

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Adkins or Fadkins Case Study
Part One –
1.
Proteins - Proteins are chains of amino acids. In general, proteins may be structural proteins used to build tissues, they may be enzymes that mediate chemical reactions, or they may be hormones. Examples of proteins would be channel proteins in cell membranes, collagen protein in the skin, actin and myosin in the muscles, and hemoglobin in red blood cells. Types of dietary sources would be, meat, milk, (both of which are not pure proteins, but are good sources of protein), eggs, grains and beans.

Carbohydrates - Complex carbohydrates are chains of simple sugars. Their primary role in animals is to provide energy. Plants use starch as an energy storage molecule, and use complex carbohydrates such as cellulose for support. Examples of carbohydrates are sucrose, glucose, fructose, starch, cellulose, and glycogen. A good dietary source for carbohydrates would be bread and grains.

Fats - Fats are a complex of fatty acid chains attached to a glycerol backbone. Fats are a type of lipid, and are used for energy, energy storage, structure, hormones, waterproofing, and insulation. Types of food would depend on the fats, saturated or unsaturated. Butter, oils, certain meats, and certain foods all contain a certain amount of lipid source.

2. The brain is a major consumer of glucose. Around 30% of glucose consumed is used by the brain, which does rely primarily on glucose for energy. If the brain is not getting enough glucose, a person can feel tired and cranky because their brains are receiving too little energy.

3. If the amine group is broken off and discarded, this creates nitrogenous waste in the blood that the kidneys must remove and discard in the urine. The remaining carbon chain can be metabolized, or used to build fatty acid chains for energy storage. While most low-carb diets will not dangerously strain the kidneys, it is true that strict reliance on protein for energy or excessive protein

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